Short History of Public Parks – Indiana Edition

Short History of Public Parks
Indiana Edition

Description

Connoisseurs of Indiana State Parks will learn the history of the Indiana State Park system as well as the individual state parks. The book includes a history of public parks and a list of Indiana county tourism sites to find local park information. The book includes an extensive list of state park systems in the United States.

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Short History of Libraries, Printing and Language – Indiana Edition
Short History of Fire Fighting – Indiana Edition
Short History of Railroads- Indiana Edition
Short History of Roads and Highways – Indiana Edition


 

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Table of Contents

English Deer Parks
Landscaped Parks
The Great European Parks
La Alameda de Hércules
Városliget
Princes Park
Regent’s Park
Birkenhead Park
Parliament Passes Bill Allowing Local Communities to Create Public Parks
Rural Cemeteries in the United States
Mount Auburn Cemetery
Rural Cemetery Act
Central Park
Lincoln Park
Yosemite Grant
National Park Service
Antiquities Act of 1906
Executive Orders in 1933
Mission 66
Wilderness Act of 1964
National Wilderness Preservation System
The Wilderness Society
Land and Water Conservation Fund Act of 1965
Wild and Scenic Rivers Act, 1968
National Scenic Trails
Volunteers in the Parks Act of 1969
General Authorities Act, 1970
Archeological Resources Protection Act, 1979
Alaska National Interest Lands Conservation Act, 1980
The Vail Agenda, 1992
United States Fish and Wildlife Service
National Wildlife Refuge System
State Parks in the United States
Indiana State Park System
Richard Lieber (September 5, 1869 – April 15, 1944)
Indiana Department of Conservation History
Department of Natural Resources
Timeline of Indiana State Parks
Brown County State Park
Chain O’ Lakes State Park
Charlestown State Park
Clifty Falls State Park
Falls of the Ohio State Park
Fort Harrison State Park
Harmonie State Park
Indiana Dunes State Park
Lincoln State Park
McCormick’s Creek State Park
Mounds State Park
O’Bannon Woods State Park
Ouabache State Park
Pokagon State Park
Potato Creek State Park
Prophetstown State Park
Shades State Park
Shakamak State Park
Spring Mill State Park
Summit Lake State Park
Tippecanoe River State Park
Turkey Run State Park
Versailles State Park
White River State Park
Whitewater Memorial State Park
Indiana Tourism Sites – Local Park Information
Acknowledgements
About the Author
Mossy Feet Books Catalogue
Sample Chapter 1
Dearborn County Court House
Indiana Courthouses – Southeast Edition

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Sample Chapter – Indiana’s Counties – Dearborn County Courthouse

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Indiana’s Counties
Dearborn County Courthouse


Dearborn County officials laid the cornerstone for Dearborn County’s fourth court house at a festive ceremony on April 13, 1871. The new court house would replace the first one, built in 1810, that had been gutted by a fire.
The First Court House
Built in 1810, the first Dearborn County Court House was a two story brick structure that mimicked the standard court house design of that period. It had a hip roof and octagonal cupola. This court house burned on March 26, 1826. Only the brick shell remained.
The “Second” Court House
Most of the county records burned in the fire so county officials asked Dearborn County residents to bring their deeds and other public records to Lawrenceburg to copy them by hand into the records. County commissioners decided not to build a new structure. They decided to use the exterior walls to house the building, constructing a new interior within the burned out walls. This building opened in 1828. The commissions authorized two annex buildings nearby to house the county clerk and the treasurer.
The Third Court House
On September 26, 1836 the county seat moved to Wilmington where it remained until it moved back to Lawrenceburg on January 4, 1844, when Indiana Governor James Whitcomb signed a law authorizing the creation of Ohio County and along with it the relocation of the county seat from Wilmington to Lawrenceburg.
The New Court House
By 1870 Dearborn County needed a new court house. The needs of the county had outgrown the capacity of the old court house. The commissioners inspected several Indiana court houses and decided they liked the Floyd County court house the best. The contacted the architect that designed it, George H. Kyle to build the new one. Mr. Kyle, a Virginia native living in Vevay since about 1840, had designed other court houses and had built up an excellent reputation. He drew up plans which the commissioners accepted on June 15, 1870. Construction of the structure took three years and was completed in 1873. The cost of the courthouse was $135,775.00. During the construction county functions took place in the Odd Fellows building at the intersection of High and Walnut Streets.
Cornerstone Ceremonies
The cornerstone laying ceremony took place with an estimated 5,000 spectators on April 13, 1871 and included guest speaker Louis Jordan. County officials included a time capsule in the cornerstone in which they secreted many items from the period. These included histories of the Masons, Odd Fellows, Druids, Good Templars as well as Lawrenceburg religious societies. They also inserted other historic documents, continental money and old coins from the Revolution.
Completion of the Court House
Workers completed construction in 1873. During the three years construction the Odd Fellows Hall served as the temporary Court House. The building cost $135,775.00 to build. It was a three story building that included city hall offices and a public opera house. The magnificent court room occupied the back half of the second floor. Built from pearl gray limestone quarried at Elliotsville, Indiana the Greek Revival three structure features four fluted columns and an arched doorway. Most of the interior features of the Court House have remained unchanged from the original structure, including the wooden and iron doors and the folding iron window shutters. Five rooms in the courthouse retain their original fireplaces. The courthouse included city offices, an opera house and a seventy foot long by fifty foot wide court room on the second floor. Community public ceremonies took place in the court room and included high school graduations and political rallies. The court room was divided in 1903 by order of Judge George E. Downey .

Sample Chapter – Indiana’s Counties – Bartholomew County

Sample Chapter

Indiana’s Counties

Bartholomew County 

Bartholomew County Facts

County Seat – Columbus

Area – 409.36 sq mi 

Population – 82,753(2018)

Founded – January 9, 1821

Named for- Joseph Bartholomew
County Government

Bartholomew County Courthouse

234 Washington St # 303, 

Columbus, IN 47201

Tourism Information

Columbus Area Visitors Center

506 Fifth Street

Columbus, IN 47201

(800) 468-6564,

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The Indiana Legislature created Bartholomew County on February 12, 1821 and takes its name from Lieutenant Colonel Joseph Bartholomew, wounded at the Battle of Tippecanoe. Local legend says that Colonel Bartholomew and General John Tipton rode horses through the area in May 1820, surveying the possibilities of the area that would become Bartholomew County. Tipton purchased several parcels of land shortly after, which formed the nucleus of future County Seat, Columbus, Indiana.
Bartholomew County CourthouseVisitors to Columbus Indiana will find this historical marker noting the importance of the Bartholomew County Historical MarkerTitle of Marker:Bartholomew County CourthouseLocation:SE corner of courthouse, 234 Washington Street, Columbus. (Bartholomew County, Indiana)Installed by:2000 Indiana Historical Bureau and Joseph Hart Chapter, Daughters of the American RevolutionMarker ID #: ID# : 03.2000.1Marker Text:
Side one:County formed by Indiana General Assembly 1821. Thirty acres of land were purchased, and John Tipton donated thirty acres, for county seat. State commissioners named county seat Tiptona–after Tipton; local elected commissioners renamed it Columbus. Tipton served as state representative, Indian agent, and United States senator.Side two:Second Empire Style courthouse, designed by Isaac Hodgson, completed 1874, is county’s fourth courthouse. Constructed of red brick with white limestone trim. Foundation is rusticated blue limestone. Original slate roof replaced 1953 with standing-seam copper. Extensive remodeling 1968; interior restoration completed 1998. Listed in National Register of Historic Places 1979.Reviewed: 29 June 2011.  Read the Review.  Learn more about our Accuracy of Marker Texts Policy.Author Note – the revisions are worked into the following narrative:Short History by the AuthorThe Indiana General Assembly created Bartholomew County on February 12, 1821 out of portions of Jackson and Delaware Counties.. The county’s name derives from Lieutenant Colonel Joseph Bartholomew. The county seat is on land which consists of two parcels, thirty purchased by the County and thirty acres obtained from John Tipton. The status of the land obtained from John Tipton is not clear. From land transfer records it is not clear if Tipton donated the land or if the County purchased it. The record is not clear either if the State Commissioners suggested the name “Tiptona.” Records indicate that early in discussions about the new county seat’s name, some did suggest Tiptona. However, on March 19, 1821, the commissioners had settled on the name “Columbus.” 
John Tipton (August 14, 1786 – April 5, 1839)John was born in Sevier County, Tennessee, where his father died in an Amerindian raid. He moved to Harrison County, Indiana in 1803 and married Martha Shields. He farmed and fought natives, leading a unit of the famed Yellow Jackets during the Battle of Tippecanoe. he gained election to the Indiana State House of Representatives from 1819 to 1823. During this time, he was involved in the formation of Bartholomew County and its county seat, Columbus.Bartholomew County CourthouseIrish born architect Isaac Hodgson designed the courthouse, one of six he designed in Indiana. Construction began in 1870 and completed in 1874. the courthouse cost $225,000 to build. Isaac Hodgson  (1826–1909)A native of Belfast, Ireland, Hodgson immigrated to the United States in 1848. He started in New York, but came to Louisville, Kentucky in 1849. He became a full architect in 1855 and during his career he worked mostly in Indiana and Minnesota. He designed six Indiana court houses, the Marion County courthouse and several notable buildings in Minnesota after he moved there in 1882.
Joseph Bartholomew (March 15, 1766 – November 3, 1840) The son of Daniel Bartholomew, Jr. and Elizabeth Catharine Bartholomew, Joseph was native to Amwell, Hunterdon, New Jersey. The family moved to Pennsylvanian around 1768, where is father died. His mother remarried, however the stepfather treated the Bartholomew children poorly. Joseph had little formal education and schooled himself in the ways of the frontier. He became an expert rifleman and experienced in woodcraft. He also acquired skills in surveying and land titles. Joseph gained a reputation as an “Indian fighter” during this period. Military ScoutWhen the Revolutionary War broke out, the ten-year-old Joseph volunteered to join the militia and helped defend the Pennsylvania frontier against Amerindian raids. He later served in the same capacity during some of the military campaigns in the Northwest Indian War. Marriage and FamilyHe married Christiana Peckinpaugh around 1788 – 1790, with whom he had ten children. The young family floated down the Ohio River by flatboat to the area around Louisville, Kentucky around 1795.  Clark CountyMove to Clark County, IndianaBartholomew was present at the signing of the 1795 Treaty of Greenville, having taken part in General Anthony Wayne’s campaign, which ended with the Battle of Fallen Timbers. Sometime around 1800 the family moved to Clark  County. he settled in the  Clark’s Grant near the town of Charlestown., Indiana where he surveyed land and took part in the defense against the natives. On May 10, 1808 his wife died giving birth. On July 30, 1812 he married Elizabeth McNaught, with whom he had five children. Elizabeth died in a horse riding accident in 1824. Bartholomew did not remarry.Military Experience IndianaWar of 1812On September 21, 1803 he had received a commission as a major in the Clark County militia. he would rise to Lieutenant Colonel, a rank he held during the Battle of Tippecanoe.  During the battle he was shot in the arm. His service during the battle gained him the rank of brigadier general. He would serve later in the White River Campaign, a short lived march up the White River Valley from Vincennes to an area north of present day Indianapolis that terminated when the soldiers involved found most of the native villages abandoned. After the War of 1812 Bartholomew served as a surveyor and farmer as well as serving in both the House of Representatives and Senate in the Indiana General Assembly. In 1821 he joined the expedition that located the site that would become Indianapolis. In May 1820, he purchased land in the area at the area where the White and Driftwood rivers join. He built a cabin on the site.  Farmer in Indiana and Move to IllinoisA friend of Bartholomew’s requested that he sponsor a $30,000 bond so his friend could purchase some property. The friend defaulted on the bond, leaving Bartholomew responsible for half the debt. The situation forced Bartholomew to sell his farm to service the loan. He moved to McLean County, Illinois, where he would later serve in the Black Hawk War in 1832. After his death he was interred in Clarksville cemetery in McLean County.

Sample Chapter – International Circus Hall of Fame – Guide to Indiana’s Historic Sites – North Central Edition International Circus Hall of Fame

Sample Chapter

International Circus Hall of Fame

Guide to Indiana’s Historic Sites – North Central Edition

April 26, 1884 – The Great Wallace Show Begins – Peru
Benjamin E. Wallace opened his Wallace and Co.’s Great World Menagerie, Grand International Mardi Gras, Highway Holiday Hidalgo and Alliance of Novelties in Peru, Indiana on April 26, 1884. The show began with great fanfare, featuring a parade of exotic animals, top-notch performers and brass band.
Benjamin E. Wallace (October 4, 1847 – April 7, 1921)
A native of Johnstown, Pennsylvania, Benjamin was the son of Ephraim and Rebecca Wallace. Wallace migrated to Peru, Indiana and established a livery business there. He became interested in the circus business so he and a business partner, James Anderson, began assembling a collection of circus equipment. The largest complement of equipment came from a circus called the W. C. Coup Circus. This circus had become financially unstable and went bankrupt. Wallace traveled to Detroit and purchased much of the equipment, which included rail cars full of tents, poles, costuming and other equipment. From other circuses, he obtained many of the animals he would need for the act. He set up headquarters outside of Peru and billed his first show for April 26, 1884 in Peru.
Fire Strikes
On January 25, 1884, a fire from an overheated stove swept through the circus. The fire killed many of the animals. Monkeys, tigers, deer and other animals perished in the fire. Wallace persisted with the opening of the show. Until the damaged living quarters for the animals could be repaired, he kept many of the surviving animals in an abandoned chair factory on Second Street in Peru.
Opening Night
The Wallace and Co.’s Great World Menagerie, Grand International Mardi Gras, Highway Holiday Hidalgo and Alliance of Novelties in Peru opened on schedule, accompanied by the Peru brass band and over 5,000 spectators. Spectators packed the two performances, with many turned away. The show was a success. The season open, the circus went on tour, visiting many small towns in southern Indiana and Ohio. The tour also included towns in Kentucky and Virginia. Since there was no entertainment of any sort in most of these towns, people packed the shows. Wallace did not disappoint them as his retinue included some of the best performers and animals that were well trained and treated. The next year he shortened the name to The Great Wallace Show. He had winter quarters for the circus in Peru.
Hagenbeck-Wallace Circus
The circus continued for many years with increasing success. In 1907, Wallace purchased the Carl Hagenbeck Circus. He combined the two acts into the Hagenbeck-Wallace Circus, which continued operations until the Flood of 1913 damaged the circus and killed many of the animals. He sold the circus to a corporation that continued the circus as the American Circus Corporation before operations finally ceased in 1938.
International Circus Hall of Fame
See a miniature of the 1934 Hagenbeck Wallace Circus as well as many other circus related exhibits.
International Circus Hall of Fame
3076 E. Circus Lane
Peru, IN 46970
800-771-0241
circushalloffame@gmail.com

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Guide to Indiana’s Historic Sites – North Central Edition

Guide to Indiana’s Historic Sites
North Central Edition

Guide to Indiana’s Historic Sites – North Central Edition
Road Trips in North Central Indiana

Take a fun tour through the rich history of Indiana using Guide to Indiana’s Historic Sites – North Central Edition as your guidebook. This tourism guide will help visitors find all of the historical treasures in Northeast Indiana.
The counties included in this historical travel book include:
Carroll
Cass
Clinton
Elk-hart
Fulton
Kosciusko
Marshall
Miami
St. Joseph
Wabash
Howard

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Other Books in the Series
Guide to Indiana’s Historic Sites – South East Edition
Guide to Indiana’s Historic Sites – South Central Edition
Guide to Indiana’s Historic Sites – Southwest Edition
Guide to Indiana’s Historic Sites – East Central Edition
Guide to Indiana’s Historic Sites – Central Edition
Guide to Indiana’s Historic Sites – West Central Edition
Guide to Indiana’s Historic Sites – North East Edition
Guide to Indiana’s Historic Sites – North West Edition
Available In Multiple Formats – Ebook And Softbound:
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Guide to Indiana’s Historic Sites – North East Edition

Guide to Indiana’s Historic Sites – North East Edition
Road Trips in Northeast Indiana
Take a fun tour through the rich history of Indiana using Guide to Indiana’s Historic Sites – Northeast Edition as your guidebook. This tourism guide will help visitors find all of the historical treasures in Northeast Indiana.
The counties included in this historical travel book include:
DeKalb
Grant
Huntington
LaGrange
Noble
Starke
Steuben
Wells
Whitley
Adams
Allen
Blackford

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Buy Direct from Author
Softbound Price – $ 14.99

Other Books in the Series
Guide to Indiana’s Historic Sites – South East Edition
Guide to Indiana’s Historic Sites – South Central Edition
Guide to Indiana’s Historic Sites – Southwest Edition
Guide to Indiana’s Historic Sites – East Central Edition
Guide to Indiana’s Historic Sites – Central Edition
Guide to Indiana’s Historic Sites – West Central Edition
Guide to Indiana’s Historic Sites – North Central EditionGuide to Indiana’s Historic Sites – North West Edition
Available In Multiple Formats – Ebook And Softbound:Kindle
Amazon Softbound
Draft to Digital Universal Link
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24 Symbols
Barnes & Noble
Barnes & Noble – Softbound
Kobo
Google Play
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© 2018 Paul Wonning

Note Card – Decatur County Land Marks Series 01

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Six scenes from around Decatur County, Indiana include:

Decatur County Park – 2

Charles Buell Park

Decatur County Historical Museum

Decatur County Courthouse

Strauther Pleak Round Barn





Sample Chapter – Guide to Indiana’s Historic Sites – Central Edition – 28th Regiment USCT

Sample Chapter

Guide to Indiana’s Historic Sites – Central Edition – 28th Regiment USCT

Guide to Indiana’s Historic Sites
Central Edition

Title of Marker:
28th Regiment USCT
Location:
Virginia Avenue & McCarty Street, Indianapolis. (Marion County, Indiana)
Installed by:
Installed: 2004 Indiana Historical Bureau, Indiana War Memorials Commission, Andrew & Esther Bowman, and African American Landmarks Committee of Historic Landmarks Foundation of Indiana, Inc.
Marker ID #:
49.2004.5
Marker Text:
Side one:
Indiana’s only African-American Civil War regiment served as part of the 28th Regiment of U.S. Colored Troops. African-American infantry was authorized in 1863 to help fill federal quota for soldiers. The Reverend Willis Revels was recruiting officer. Recruits trained at Camp Fremont, established on land near here owned by Calvin Fletcher.
Side two:
In April 1864, six companies were organized and activated. The 28th regiment served valiantly in the Battle of the Crater at Petersburg, Virginia on July 30, 1864, when nearly half of the men were killed or wounded. The 28th returned to Indianapolis January 6, 1866 to a reception in its honor; officers and men were discharged January 9.
Brief History
The United States Department of War authorized the only black troops from Indiana that would serve during the American Civil War on November 30, 1863. Enlistments began on December 3, 1863 and moved to a training camp on the south side of Indianapolis called Camp Fremont. The regiment’s commanding officer was Captain Charles S. Russell. The regiment left Indiana on April 24, 1864 for Washington, DC and then to Alexandra, Virginia for additional training.
Combat
On June 21, the 28th engaged in its first battle at White House, Virginia. General Sherman took the unit along on his march through the Chickahominy swamp. During this campaign, the unit suffered heavy casualties. It participated in the sieges of Richmond and Petersburg in Virginia. It lost almost half its soldiers to death and wounding at the Battle of the Crater in Virginia. After reinforcement and enlargement to a full regiment, the unit marched into Richmond, Virginia on Richmond, April 4, 1865. At war’s end, the Army deployed the regiment to Brazos, Santiago and Corpus Christi, Texas to deal with unrest there. The regiment mustered out on November 8, 1865. It returned to Indianapolis on January 8, 1866 to a reception held in its honor.