Sample Chapter – Congress Authorizes John James Dufour to Select Land in Indiana Territory – Switzerland County

Ohio River – Switzerland County, Indiana

Sample Chapter

Indiana’s Timeless Tales – The Indiana Territory – Book 1

May 01, 1802 – Congress Authorizes John James Dufour to Select Land in Indiana Territory

John James Dufour immigrated to the United States to develop European style wines from American grown grapes. Thus far, American attempts to make a good wine had been a failure. Due to the efforts of John James Dufour, the commercial wine industry in the United States began in Switzerland County, Indiana.

John James Dufour (1763 – 1827)

A native of Canton de Vaud, Switzerland, Dufour studied viticulture for twenty years in Switzerland before coming to the United States in 1796. He had come representing the  Vineyard Society of Switzerland. The members of the organization were considering immigrating to America to make wine, escaping war torn Europe. He landed in Philadelphia in 1796 and embarked on a tour of vineyards across America that included stops at Thomas Jefferson’s Monticello, St. Louis, Missouri, Ohio, Pennsylvania and Kentucky. He eventually ended up at a site on the Big Bend of the Kentucky River about forty-five miles southeast of Lexington. He established an experimental vineyard at this site, planting thirty-five varieties of European grapes.

Promising Results

The vineyard proved so promising that in 1800, Dufour wrote to his family, still in Switzerland. Seventeen family members responded, coming to Lexington on July 3, 1801. The family operated this vineyard for a number of years.

Failure in Kentucky

The vineyard near Lexington eventually failed. Disease eventually killed the vines and the Dufours abandoned the site after selecting several varieties that had survived. These vines they believed to be still European vines, but in truth they were hybrids. The European varieties had cross bred with the European ones, creating vines that could withstand New World diseases and the harsh climate.

American Wines

American grapes would produce wine, but it was wine of an inferior quality. The grapes were tart and the wine they made was almost unpalatable to those that appreciate good wine. Early efforts to grow European grapes had ended in failure. The European grapes succumbed to New World pests and diseases to which they had no immunity. The harsh climate also proved fatal to the tender European vines. Wine drinkers had to drink imported wines which the European vintners had fortified with distilled spirits so they would survive the long voyage across the ocean.

Swiss Colony in the  Indiana Territory

Congress was receptive to the idea of establishing a wine industry in the United States and had encouraged Swiss vintners to come to America. Dufour thus found fertile ground for his proposal to Congress to grant him the right on May 1, 1802, to select and purchase four sections of land along the Ohio River in the Indiana  Territory to grow grapes. Congress passed the law that allowed Dufour to purchase this land with twelve years to pay it back. This was much more generous than the provisions of the Harrison Land Act of 1800 which allowed only four years to pay land in the Northwest Territory off.

Sample Chapter – Short History of Roads and Highways – Indiana Edition – Forks of Wabash

Sample Chapter 
Short History of Roads and Highways – Indiana Edition 
Forks of Wabash
This historical marker in Huntington, County notes the location of an important portage road that linked the Great Lakes with the Mississippi River.
Title of Marker:
Forks of Wabash
Location:
Business US 24/ W. Park Drive, east of SR 9 junction, Huntington. (Huntington County, Indiana)
Installed by:
Society of Indiana Pioneers
Marker ID #: 
35.1972.1
Marker Text: 
The junction of the Wabash and Little rivers, 100 yards south, was the western terminus of the Maumee-Wabash long portage and, in 1835, of the first section of the Wabash and Erie Canal. During the 18th century French and English traders passed this way and, in 1778, Henry Hamilton brought 171 British troops and 350 Indians with 40 boats through the portage en-route to retake Fort Sackville at Vincennes. Three Miami villages were located here and Chiefs Richardville and LaFontaine once lived here. The Forks was the scene of many Indian councils and the Miami Treaties of 1834, 1838 and 1840.
Brief History by the Author
During the late Seventeenth Century the Miami tribe controlled one of the most valuable pieces of real estate in the Ohio River Valley. The area between the St. Mary’s River and Wabash River proved the shortest portage point between two great waterways, the Great Lakes and the Mississippi River. The portage, or “carrying place” in French, allowed travelers moving by water access to the Mississippi River from the St. Lawrence River and beyond. The French utilized the portage, at the pleasure of the Miami, during their early explorations into the North American interior. The Miami realized the importance of the portage, as it had been used by Amerindian tribes for centuries. The tribe allowed their friends, the French, to use it, after paying a toll.
The Importance of the Portage
Traveling by canoe, a traveler could voyage from Lake Erie up the Maumee River to the junction of three rivers, the Maumee, St. Joseph and St. Mary’s. From the junction, the route turned southeast on the St. Mary’s to the portage point. Canoeists needed only carry their canoes a short distance, which varied by the season of the year, only a few miles from the portage point on the St. Mary’s River to the Wabash. Once in the Wabash a traveler could journey down the Wabash to the Ohio and on to the Mississippi. The French used to portage point to move goods from their colonies in New France to New Orleans. The Amerindians used it to move the furs they collected to their trading partners further east. All these travelers had to pass through the lands of the Miami Indians, who collected a toll from everyone.
Fort Wayne
Realizing the importance of the spot where the three rivers joined, the French established a trading post near the junction in 1715, followed in 1722 by a fort. The English also occupied the site after driving the French from North America at the conclusion of the French and Indian War. General Anthony Wayne built another fort on the junction during the Indian Wars. Many of the treaty negotiations between the Amerindians and the United States took place there. The portage maintained importance until the 1830’s, when the Wabash-Erie Canal made it unnecessary.

Sample Chapter – A History of Ohio County, Indiana – Cass Township

Sample Chapter

A History of Ohio County, Indiana

Cass Township

Cass Township
Organized – 1845
Area Total – 18.54 sq mi
Elevation – 830 ft
Population (2010) – 714

Unincorporated towns
Aberdeen
Bascom Corner
Blue
Cofield Corner
Downey Corner

Geography
Cass Township is located in the south-central region of Ohio County. Pike Township bounds it to the west, Union to the north and Randolph to the east. Switzerland County forms the southern boundary. Indiana State Road 262 crosses the northern portion of the township. Indiana State Road 56 crosses the southern part. Main backroads include Cass Union, on a north/south axis, and Aberdeen Road, on an east/west axis. These two roads meet at Aberdeen in the south-central part of the township.

Thumbnail History
The earliest land sales occurred in 1810, with James Curry and Jesse Drake as the first recorded settlers in the township. These early settlers and the ones that followed recorded little problems with the Indians other than stolen horses. By the 1830’s several horse mills were grinding grain for local farmers and sawmills to turn trees into lumber. Several coopers were located in the township making barrels that found use in shipping materials down the Ohio River. They sold these barrels mostly in Rising Sun. The township was organized in 1845.

Sample Chapter – Indiana’s Counties – Switzerland County

Sample Chapter

Indiana’s Counties

Switzerland County

Switzerland County

County Seat – Vevay

Area – 224 sq mi

Population – 10,696 (2017)

Founded – 1814

Named for- European nation of Switzerland

County Government

Switzerland County Courthouse

212 West Main Street

Vevay, IN

http://www.switzerland-county.com/

Tourism Information

Switzerland County Tourism

128 West Main St, Vevay, IN 47043, US

(812) 427-3237

https://switzcotourism.com/

Thumbnail History

The Indiana Territorial Assembly created Switzerland County two years before Indiana became a state in 1814. The legislature named the county for the native land of many of its early inhabitants, Switzerland. The first commercial wineries in the United States were located here, and the county considers itself the birthplace of commercial winemaking in America. Residents celebrate this heritage yearly during the Swiss Wine Festival in late August.

June 11, 1802 – Swiss Colony Lands Selected – Southern Indiana

John James Dufour immigrated to the United States to develop European style wines from American grown grapes. Thus far, American attempts to make a good wine had been a failure. Due to the efforts of John James Dufour, the commercial wine industry in the United States began in Switzerland County, Indiana.

John James Dufour (1763 – 1827)

A native of Canton de Vaud, Switzerland, Dufour studied viticulture for twenty years in Switzerland before coming to the United States in 1796. He had come representing the Vineyard Society of Switzerland and purchased 2560 acres near the future town of Vevay. The members of the organization were considering immigrating to America to make wine, escaping war torn Europe. He landed in Philadelphia in 1796 and embarked on a tour of vineyards across America that included stops at Thomas Jefferson’s Monticello, St. Louis, Missouri, Ohio, Pennsylvania and Kentucky. He eventually ended up at a site on the Big Bend of the Kentucky River about twenty-five miles south of Lexington. He established an experimental vineyard at this site, planting thirty-five varieties of European grapes.

Promising Results

The vineyard proved so promising that in 1800, Dufour wrote to his family, still in Switzerland. Seventeen family members responded, coming to Lexington on July 3, 1801. The family operated this vineyard for a number of years.

County

Establishment of Switzerland County

Indiana Territorial Governor Thomas Posey appointed Dufour as Assessor and County Surveyor in 1812. Dufour’s next project was to lead an effort to establish a new county with Vevay, which he had founded on June 11, 1802. The Territorial Assembly created Switzerland County in 1814, naming it after Switzerland, the home of many of the new immigrants to the region.

Wine Production in Switzerland County

American Wines

American grapes would produce wine, but it was wine of an inferior quality. The grapes were tart and the wine they made was almost unpalatable to those that appreciate good wine. Early efforts to grow European grapes had ended in failure. The European grapes succumbed to New World pests and diseases to which they had no immunity. The harsh climate also proved fatal to the tender European vines. Wine drinkers had to drink imported wines that the European vintners had fortified with distilled spirits so they would survive the long voyage across the ocean.

Swiss Colony in the Indiana Territory

Congress was receptive to the idea of establishing a wine industry in the United States and had encouraged Swiss vintners to come to America. Dufour thus found fertile ground for his proposal to Congress to grant him the right to select and purchase four sections of land along the Ohio River in the Northwest Territory to grow grapes. Congress passed the law that allowed Dufour to purchase this land with twelve years to pay it back. This was much more generous than the provisions of the Harrison Land Act of 1800 that allowed only four years to pay the land in the Northwest Territory off. Dufour and his associates selected the site, now Vevay, Indiana on June 11, 1802.

Failure in Kentucky

The vineyard near Lexington eventually failed. Disease eventually killed the vines and the Dufours abandoned the site after selecting several varieties that had survived. These vines they believed to be still European vines, but in truth, they were hybrids. The European varieties had crossbred with the European ones, creating vines that could withstand New World diseases and the harsh climate. The vineyards in the new “Swiss Colony” eventually produced good wines in bulk by 1809. The wines became popular and sold well in Cincinnati, St. Louis, Louisville and Lexington. This flourishing wine industry eventually produced 20,000 gallons of wine a year. By the 1820’s the vineyards succumbed to economic depression and distilled whiskey from Kentucky.

Indiana Wines

Indiana Wines have once again become a flourishing business and local wineries in the Vevay area and across Indiana thrive. Vevay, laid out by the Dufours in 1813, celebrates this Swiss wine heritage with its Swiss Wine Festival held annually in August.

Switzerland

Prehistoric settlement of Switzerland dates back to about 150,000 years ago. The Romans conquered the tribes that made up the Swiss Alps in 15 BC. The region remained a part of the Roman Empire until the 3rd Century, when Roman strength failed and the region came under the dominion of the German Kings of the Burgundians. Division of the nation and incorporation into the Frankish kingdoms followed and continued until the Holy Roman Empire reunited it around 1000 AD. Several of the cantons unified under the  Old Swiss Confederacy in 1353, which existed until Napoleon conquered it in 1798. It was during this tumultuous period that many of the Swiss fled from the region and migrated into the Ohio River Valley to the land that would become Switzerland County. Conflict between the invading French and the Swiss continued until the Congress of Vienna in 1815. It was at this Congress that the nations of Europe agreed to consider Switzerland as a neutral country. A period of internal strife followed which ended when the Swiss drew up a federal constitution loosely modeled on that of the United States in 1748. This federal republic still exists after escaping invasion during both the First and Second World Wars.

Sample Chapter – Indiana’s Counties – Dearborn County Courthouse

Sample Chapter

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Indiana’s Counties
Dearborn County Courthouse


Dearborn County officials laid the cornerstone for Dearborn County’s fourth court house at a festive ceremony on April 13, 1871. The new court house would replace the first one, built in 1810, that had been gutted by a fire.
The First Court House
Built in 1810, the first Dearborn County Court House was a two story brick structure that mimicked the standard court house design of that period. It had a hip roof and octagonal cupola. This court house burned on March 26, 1826. Only the brick shell remained.
The “Second” Court House
Most of the county records burned in the fire so county officials asked Dearborn County residents to bring their deeds and other public records to Lawrenceburg to copy them by hand into the records. County commissioners decided not to build a new structure. They decided to use the exterior walls to house the building, constructing a new interior within the burned out walls. This building opened in 1828. The commissions authorized two annex buildings nearby to house the county clerk and the treasurer.
The Third Court House
On September 26, 1836 the county seat moved to Wilmington where it remained until it moved back to Lawrenceburg on January 4, 1844, when Indiana Governor James Whitcomb signed a law authorizing the creation of Ohio County and along with it the relocation of the county seat from Wilmington to Lawrenceburg.
The New Court House
By 1870 Dearborn County needed a new court house. The needs of the county had outgrown the capacity of the old court house. The commissioners inspected several Indiana court houses and decided they liked the Floyd County court house the best. The contacted the architect that designed it, George H. Kyle to build the new one. Mr. Kyle, a Virginia native living in Vevay since about 1840, had designed other court houses and had built up an excellent reputation. He drew up plans which the commissioners accepted on June 15, 1870. Construction of the structure took three years and was completed in 1873. The cost of the courthouse was $135,775.00. During the construction county functions took place in the Odd Fellows building at the intersection of High and Walnut Streets.
Cornerstone Ceremonies
The cornerstone laying ceremony took place with an estimated 5,000 spectators on April 13, 1871 and included guest speaker Louis Jordan. County officials included a time capsule in the cornerstone in which they secreted many items from the period. These included histories of the Masons, Odd Fellows, Druids, Good Templars as well as Lawrenceburg religious societies. They also inserted other historic documents, continental money and old coins from the Revolution.
Completion of the Court House
Workers completed construction in 1873. During the three years construction the Odd Fellows Hall served as the temporary Court House. The building cost $135,775.00 to build. It was a three story building that included city hall offices and a public opera house. The magnificent court room occupied the back half of the second floor. Built from pearl gray limestone quarried at Elliotsville, Indiana the Greek Revival three structure features four fluted columns and an arched doorway. Most of the interior features of the Court House have remained unchanged from the original structure, including the wooden and iron doors and the folding iron window shutters. Five rooms in the courthouse retain their original fireplaces. The courthouse included city offices, an opera house and a seventy foot long by fifty foot wide court room on the second floor. Community public ceremonies took place in the court room and included high school graduations and political rallies. The court room was divided in 1903 by order of Judge George E. Downey .

Sample Chapter – Indiana’s Counties – Bartholomew County

Sample Chapter

Indiana’s Counties

Bartholomew County 

Bartholomew County Facts

County Seat – Columbus

Area – 409.36 sq mi 

Population – 82,753(2018)

Founded – January 9, 1821

Named for- Joseph Bartholomew
County Government

Bartholomew County Courthouse

234 Washington St # 303, 

Columbus, IN 47201

Tourism Information

Columbus Area Visitors Center

506 Fifth Street

Columbus, IN 47201

(800) 468-6564,

Facebook

Thumbnail History

The Indiana Legislature created Bartholomew County on February 12, 1821 and takes its name from Lieutenant Colonel Joseph Bartholomew, wounded at the Battle of Tippecanoe. Local legend says that Colonel Bartholomew and General John Tipton rode horses through the area in May 1820, surveying the possibilities of the area that would become Bartholomew County. Tipton purchased several parcels of land shortly after, which formed the nucleus of future County Seat, Columbus, Indiana.
Bartholomew County CourthouseVisitors to Columbus Indiana will find this historical marker noting the importance of the Bartholomew County Historical MarkerTitle of Marker:Bartholomew County CourthouseLocation:SE corner of courthouse, 234 Washington Street, Columbus. (Bartholomew County, Indiana)Installed by:2000 Indiana Historical Bureau and Joseph Hart Chapter, Daughters of the American RevolutionMarker ID #: ID# : 03.2000.1Marker Text:
Side one:County formed by Indiana General Assembly 1821. Thirty acres of land were purchased, and John Tipton donated thirty acres, for county seat. State commissioners named county seat Tiptona–after Tipton; local elected commissioners renamed it Columbus. Tipton served as state representative, Indian agent, and United States senator.Side two:Second Empire Style courthouse, designed by Isaac Hodgson, completed 1874, is county’s fourth courthouse. Constructed of red brick with white limestone trim. Foundation is rusticated blue limestone. Original slate roof replaced 1953 with standing-seam copper. Extensive remodeling 1968; interior restoration completed 1998. Listed in National Register of Historic Places 1979.Reviewed: 29 June 2011.  Read the Review.  Learn more about our Accuracy of Marker Texts Policy.Author Note – the revisions are worked into the following narrative:Short History by the AuthorThe Indiana General Assembly created Bartholomew County on February 12, 1821 out of portions of Jackson and Delaware Counties.. The county’s name derives from Lieutenant Colonel Joseph Bartholomew. The county seat is on land which consists of two parcels, thirty purchased by the County and thirty acres obtained from John Tipton. The status of the land obtained from John Tipton is not clear. From land transfer records it is not clear if Tipton donated the land or if the County purchased it. The record is not clear either if the State Commissioners suggested the name “Tiptona.” Records indicate that early in discussions about the new county seat’s name, some did suggest Tiptona. However, on March 19, 1821, the commissioners had settled on the name “Columbus.” 
John Tipton (August 14, 1786 – April 5, 1839)John was born in Sevier County, Tennessee, where his father died in an Amerindian raid. He moved to Harrison County, Indiana in 1803 and married Martha Shields. He farmed and fought natives, leading a unit of the famed Yellow Jackets during the Battle of Tippecanoe. he gained election to the Indiana State House of Representatives from 1819 to 1823. During this time, he was involved in the formation of Bartholomew County and its county seat, Columbus.Bartholomew County CourthouseIrish born architect Isaac Hodgson designed the courthouse, one of six he designed in Indiana. Construction began in 1870 and completed in 1874. the courthouse cost $225,000 to build. Isaac Hodgson  (1826–1909)A native of Belfast, Ireland, Hodgson immigrated to the United States in 1848. He started in New York, but came to Louisville, Kentucky in 1849. He became a full architect in 1855 and during his career he worked mostly in Indiana and Minnesota. He designed six Indiana court houses, the Marion County courthouse and several notable buildings in Minnesota after he moved there in 1882.
Joseph Bartholomew (March 15, 1766 – November 3, 1840) The son of Daniel Bartholomew, Jr. and Elizabeth Catharine Bartholomew, Joseph was native to Amwell, Hunterdon, New Jersey. The family moved to Pennsylvanian around 1768, where is father died. His mother remarried, however the stepfather treated the Bartholomew children poorly. Joseph had little formal education and schooled himself in the ways of the frontier. He became an expert rifleman and experienced in woodcraft. He also acquired skills in surveying and land titles. Joseph gained a reputation as an “Indian fighter” during this period. Military ScoutWhen the Revolutionary War broke out, the ten-year-old Joseph volunteered to join the militia and helped defend the Pennsylvania frontier against Amerindian raids. He later served in the same capacity during some of the military campaigns in the Northwest Indian War. Marriage and FamilyHe married Christiana Peckinpaugh around 1788 – 1790, with whom he had ten children. The young family floated down the Ohio River by flatboat to the area around Louisville, Kentucky around 1795.  Clark CountyMove to Clark County, IndianaBartholomew was present at the signing of the 1795 Treaty of Greenville, having taken part in General Anthony Wayne’s campaign, which ended with the Battle of Fallen Timbers. Sometime around 1800 the family moved to Clark  County. he settled in the  Clark’s Grant near the town of Charlestown., Indiana where he surveyed land and took part in the defense against the natives. On May 10, 1808 his wife died giving birth. On July 30, 1812 he married Elizabeth McNaught, with whom he had five children. Elizabeth died in a horse riding accident in 1824. Bartholomew did not remarry.Military Experience IndianaWar of 1812On September 21, 1803 he had received a commission as a major in the Clark County militia. he would rise to Lieutenant Colonel, a rank he held during the Battle of Tippecanoe.  During the battle he was shot in the arm. His service during the battle gained him the rank of brigadier general. He would serve later in the White River Campaign, a short lived march up the White River Valley from Vincennes to an area north of present day Indianapolis that terminated when the soldiers involved found most of the native villages abandoned. After the War of 1812 Bartholomew served as a surveyor and farmer as well as serving in both the House of Representatives and Senate in the Indiana General Assembly. In 1821 he joined the expedition that located the site that would become Indianapolis. In May 1820, he purchased land in the area at the area where the White and Driftwood rivers join. He built a cabin on the site.  Farmer in Indiana and Move to IllinoisA friend of Bartholomew’s requested that he sponsor a $30,000 bond so his friend could purchase some property. The friend defaulted on the bond, leaving Bartholomew responsible for half the debt. The situation forced Bartholomew to sell his farm to service the loan. He moved to McLean County, Illinois, where he would later serve in the Black Hawk War in 1832. After his death he was interred in Clarksville cemetery in McLean County.

Sample Chapter – Benjamin Parke – Indiana’s Counties

Sample Chapter
Benjamin Parke
Indiana’s Counties


Parke County in Indiana derives its name from Benjamin Parke.
Benjamin Parke (September 2, 1777 – July 12, 1835) 
A native of New Jersey, Parke’s education was scanty as a child. At twenty years old, he moved to Lexington, Kentucky where he studied law with local attorney James Brown. Two years later, in 1799, he moved to Vincennes, Indiana. A supporter of Indiana Territorial Governor William Henry Harrison, he received an appointment as Attorney General of the Indiana Territory. His term, from 1804 through 1808, coincided with his service as Territorial Delegate to Congress from 1805 to 1808. Parke commanded an Indiana Light Dragoons at the 1811 Battle of Tippecanoe. Harrison included him on his staff during the War of 1812. During his service, he rose to the rank of colonel. After the war, he attended the state constitutional convention in 1816 as a representative of Knox County. After statehood, Parke represented the United States at the Treaty of St. Mary’s in 1818. He also served as the first president of the Indiana Historical Society when it formed on December 11, 1830. President James Monroe appointed him to the United States District Court for the District of Indiana. He held that position until his death in 1835.

Note Card – Decatur County Land Marks Series 01

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Six scenes from around Decatur County, Indiana include:

Decatur County Park – 2

Charles Buell Park

Decatur County Historical Museum

Decatur County Courthouse

Strauther Pleak Round Barn





Note Card – Dearborn County Landmark Series # 1

Note Card – Dearborn County Landmark Series # 1

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6 Familiar landscapes from around Dearborn County
Lesko Park
Veraestau
Guilford Covered Bridge
Ohio River at Lesko Park
Carnegie Hall – Moore’s Hill
Angevine Log Cabin – Lawrenceburg

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Note Card – Covered Bridge Series 2 – Park County Covered Bridges

Note Card – Covered Bridge Series 2 – Park County Covered Bridges

This assortment includes six pretty covered bridges in Parke County, Indiana.
Cox Ford Covered Bridge
Narrows Covered Bridge
West Union Covered Bridge
Bowshear Covered Bridge
Bridgeton Mill Covered Bridge
Neet Covered Bridge

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