Time Line of the American Revolution – 1775

Visit Mossy Feet Books on Facebook

Time Line of the American Revolution – 1775

Discover the obscure, little known actions as well as the famous ones in the Time Line of the American Revolution – 1775. This journal of the first year of the United States War of Independence reveals the important events of the first year of the colonial rebellion.
Buy Direct from Author

$12.99
$3.00 Shipping 





Available In Multiple Formats – Ebook And Softbound:

Draft to Digital Universal Link
Kindle
Amazon Softbound
Barnes & Noble
Barnes & Noble – Softbound
Kobo
Google Play
Scribid
24 Symbols
Walmart Books
Apple

Wholesale Pricing Available
For more information, contact:
Mossyfeetbooks@gmail.com
Orders over $50.00 Free Shipping

Join Paul Wonning on:
Facebook
Twitter
Linkedin
YouTube
Pinterest

Paul Wonning’s Books on Amazon Page
Paul Wonning’s Books on Scribd Page
Paul Wonning’s Books on Apple
Paul Wonning’s Books on Kobo
Paul Wonning’s Books on Barnes and Noble
Paul Wonning’s Books on 24 Symbols
Paul Wonning’s Books on Google Play
Paul Wonning’s Books on Indigo
Paul Wonning’s Books on Playster
Paul Wonning’s Books on OverDrive
Search Paul Wonning on Ingrams
© 2019 Paul Wonning

Colonial American History Stories – 1770 – 1774

 Colonial American History Stories - 1770 – 1774
 Colonial American History Stories
1770 – 1774

Visit Mossy Feet Books on Facebook

 Colonial American History Stories – 1770 – 1774 features an historical chronicle of the pre-revolutionary years of the United States. The time line presents a journal of events that led to the conflict between the British and their North American colonists. The events, some obscure and almost forgotten, played a role in the developing drama that eventually led to American independence.

Softbound Price – $9.99
Buy Direct From Author
 $3.00 Shipping
More Options Below





Available On:
Draft to Digital Universal Link
Kindle
Amazon Softbound
Barnes & Noble
Barnes & Noble – Softbound
Kobo
Google Play
Scribid
24 Symbols
Apple
Vivlio
Walmart
Available in multiple ebook formats and softbound
Buy Paul Wonning’s At:

Wholesale Pricing Available
For more information, contact:
Mossyfeetbooks@gmail.com
Orders over $50.00 Free Shipping
Download the Mossy Feet Books catalog today for great reading.

Facebook
Mossy Feet Books

Twitter
Linkedin
YouTube
Pinterest
Paul Wonning’s Books on Amazon Page
Paul Wonning’s Books on Scribd Page
Draft 2 Digital – Universal Links
Paul Wonning’s Books on Apple
Paul Wonning’s Books on Kobo
Paul Wonning’s Books on Barnes and Noble
Paul Wonning’s Books on 24 Symbols
Paul Wonning’s Books on Google Play

Paul Wonning’s Books on Indigo

Paul Wonning’s Books on Playster

Paul Wonning’s Books on OverDrive

Search Paul Wonning on Ingrams
© 2018 Paul Wonning

Colonial American History Stories – 1763 – 1769

Colonial American History Stories - 1763 – 1769
Colonial American History Stories – 1763 – 1769

Colonial American History Stories – 1763 – 1769 contains dozens of history stories presented in a time line that begins in 1663 with the first issue of the Georgia Gazette and ends with  George Washington’s petition for the land promised soldiers who fought in the French and Indian War. The historical events include both famous ones as well as many little known, forgotten stories that the mists time have obscured. These reader friendly  stories include:
April 19, 1763 – Teedyuscung, King of the Delaware, Murdered in His Home
November 15, 1763 – Charles Mason And Jeremiah Dixon Begin Surveying Mason-Dixon Line
May 30, 1765 – First U.S. Medical College Opens In Philadelphia
October 1, 1765 – The State of British North America
May 1, 1769 – Daniel Boone Begins Exploring Kentucky
Softbound Price – $10.99
Buy Direct From Author





Available On:

Kindle
Amazon Softbound
Barnes & Noble
Barnes & Noble – Softbound
Kobo
Google Play
24 Symbols
Apple
Walmart
Vivilio
Facebook
Indiana Places
Abes Beer Garden
Stories of American History
Mossy Feet Books

Visit Mossy Feet Books on Facebook

Twitter
Linkedin
YouTube
Pinterest
Paul Wonning’s Books on Amazon Page
Paul Wonning’s Books on Smashwords Page
Paul Wonning’s Books on Apple
Paul Wonning’s Books on Kobo
Paul Wonning’s Books on Barnes and Noble
Paul Wonning’s Books on Createspace
Paul Wonning’s Books on Google Play
© Paul Wonning
© Paul Wonning 2020

Colonial American History Stories – 1753 – 1763

Colonial American History Stories - 1753 – 1763
Colonial American History Stories
1753 – 1763

Colonial American History Stories – 1753 – 1763 contains almost 300 history stories presented in a timeline that begins in 1655 with the performance of the first documented play performed in British North America and ends with the switch from the Julian to the Gregorian calendar in 1752. The historical events include both famous ones as well as many little known, forgotten stories that the mists time have obscured. These reader friendly stories include:
March 10, 1753- Liberty Bell Hung
April 9, 1754 – Slave Girl Priscilla Begins Her Horrible Journey
April 12, 1755 – Ben Franklin Receives Letter Describing Death by Tapeworm
November 01, 1756 – Samuel Adams Elected Tax Collector
June 28, 1762 – First Reported Counterfeiting Attempt at Boston

Visit Mossy Feet Books on Facebook

Buy Direct from the Author
$8.99 Softbound
$3.00 Shipping per Order





Available On:
Kindle
Amazon Softbound
Playster
Barnes & Noble
Barnes & Noble – Softbound
Kobo
Google Play
Scribid
24 Symbols
Apple
.Create Space – Softcover Book
Facebook
Indiana Places
Abes Beer Garden
Stories of American History
Mossy Feet Books

Twitter
Linkedin
YouTube
Pinterest
Paul Wonning’s Books on Amazon Page
Paul Wonning’s Books on Smashwords Page
Paul Wonning’s Books on Apple
Paul Wonning’s Books on Kobo
Paul Wonning’s Books on Barnes and Noble
Paul Wonning’s Books on Createspace
Paul Wonning’s Books on Google Play
© Paul Wonning
© Paul Wonning 2017 © Paul R. Wonning 2017

Colonial American History Stories – 1665 – 1753

Colonial American History Stories - 1665 – 1753
Colonial American History Stories – 1665 – 1753

Colonial American History Stories – 1665 – 1753 contains almost 300 history stories presented in a timeline that begins in 1655 with the performance of the first documented play performed in British North America and ends with the switch from the Julian to the Gregorian Calendar in 1752. The historical events include both famous ones as well as many little known, forgotten stories that the mists time have obscured. These reader friendly  stories include:
September 27, 1540 – Society of Jesus (Jesuits) Founded By Ignatius Loyola
December 19, 1675 – The Great Swamp Fight
September 19, 1676 – Bacon’s Rebellion – Bacon Burns Jamestown
April 18, 1689 – 1689 Boston Revolt
February 29, 1692 – Sarah Good, Sarah Osborne and Tituba Accused Of Witchcraft in Salem, Massachusetts
May 22, 1718 – Edward Teach – Blackbeard – Begins Blockade of Charlestown.
November 02, 1734 – Daniel Boone Born
December 08, 1741 – Vitus Bering Died
December 23, 1750 – Ben Franklin Attempts to Electrocute a Turkey
December 31, 1752 – Julian/Gregorian Calendar Switch Complete


Buy Direct from the Author
$14.99 Softbound
$3.00 Shipping per Order

Available In Multiple Formats – Ebook And Softbound:
Kindle
Amazon Softbound
Barnes & Noble
Barnes & Noble – Softbound
Kobo
Google Play
Scribid
24 Symbols
Walmart Books
Apple
Vivlio

Colonial American History Stories – 1215 – 1664

Colonial American History Stories – 1215 – 1664
Colonial American History Stories – 1215 – 1664 contains almost 300 history stories presented in a timeline that begins in 1215 with the signing of the Magna Carta to the printing of the first Bible in Colonial America in 1664. The historical events include both famous ones as well as many forgotten stories that the mists time have obscured. These reader friendly stories include:
June 15, 1215 – King John I signs Magna Carta at Runnymede England
October 19, 1469 – Ferdinand and Isabella Marry, Uniting Aragon and Castile
August 3, 1492 – Christopher Columbus Sets Sail On His First Voyage
July 22, 1587 – Lost Colony Established
June 14, 1623 – First Breach-Of-Promise Lawsuit In Colonies
August 29, 1619 ? – First Blacks Land at Jamestown Virginia

Buy Direct from the Author
$14.99 Softbound
$3.00 Shipping per Order






 Buy Direct from the Author
$60.00
All six volumes take you through colonial American history from Christopher Columbus’ first voyage to the beginning of the Revolution. Explore the fascinating years that shaped the United States. 
$72 Retail Value
$60.00 – 
$3.00 Shipping
Colonial American History Stories – 1215 – 1664Colonial American History Stories – 1665 – 1753Colonial American History Stories – 1753 – 1763Colonial American History Stories – 1763 – 1769Colonial American History Stories – 1770 – 1774An American Revolution Time Line – 1775
Available On:Kindle
Amazon Softbound
Barnes & Noble
Barnes & Noble – Softbound
Kobo
Google Play
Apple
Vivilio

Scribid

Walmart Books
Paul Wonning’s Books on Amazon Page
Paul Wonning’s Books on Smashwords Page
Paul Wonning’s Books on Apple
Paul Wonning’s Books on Kobo
Paul Wonning’s Books on Barnes and Noble

© Paul R. Wonning 2017

The Armies of the Revolutionary War

Description:

Readers of this book will discover the nature of the organization, the armaments and the supply systems the armies relied on to function in the field.

Sample Chapter

Table of Contents

Buy Direct from Author
Softbound Price – $

To Be Determined

Pay Pal Button Here

Visit Mossy Feet Books on Facebook

Other Books in the
Facebook

Available In Multiple Formats – Ebook And Softbound:

Kindle

Amazon Softbound

Barnes & Noble

Barnes & Noble – Softbound

Kobo

Google Play

Scribid

24 Symbols

Walmart Books

Apple
.

Wholesale Pricing Available
For more information, contact:
Mossyfeetbooks@gmail.com
Orders over $50.00 Free Shipping

Top of Page

Twitter

Linkedin

YouTube

Pinterest

Paul Wonning’s Books on Amazon Page
Paul Wonning’s Books on Scribd Page

Paul Wonning’s Books on Apple

Paul Wonning’s Books on Kobo

Paul Wonning’s Books on Barnes and Noble

Paul Wonning’s Books on 24 Symbols

Paul Wonning’s Books on Google Play

Paul Wonning’s Books on Indigo

Paul Wonning’s Books on Playster

Paul Wonning’s Books on OverDrive

Search Paul Wonning on Ingrams

Table of Contents

Top of Page

© 2020 Paul Wonning

Sample Chapter – The Armies of the Revolutionary War – The Musicians

Sample Chapter

The Armies of the Revolutionary War

The Musicians

Role of the Musicians in Continental Army

Musicians played a key role in the functioning of the Continental Army as they communicated the officer’s orders to the soldiers over the din of battle. The overwhelming cacophony of cannon and musket fire, the clang of swords and men shouting or cursing while shrouded in smoke during an intense conflict made passing orders by voice or signal impossible. Soldiers could, however, hear the sound of the fife and drum over the sounds of battle.  Officers could relay quickly orders to fire, advance, retreat as well as other battlefield commands. The musicians also relayed other orders as well, as the entire life of a soldier was regulated by the sound of fife and drum. Musicians signaled when it was time to get up in the morning, eat, form up for drill and go to bed. The cadence of the music during a march regulated the speed the soldiers moved. Military accounts at the time indicate that the people could hear the music produced by a band playing on fifes and drums over artillery fire three miles away.

History

German and Swiss armies in the Fifteenth Century are believed by many historians to have originated the practice of using a military band to communicate on the battlefield. It was common practice during this time for other nations to hire Swiss and German armies as mercenaries, thus the practice spread. It was common to assign each regiment two fifers and two drummers. When regiments were united on parade or maneuvers, the bands were detached from their units and “banded,” together, thus giving us the origin of the term “band,” as it applies to a group of musicians.

The Musicians

The musicians were considered non-commissioned officers and received payment as such. The drum-major and fife-major led their respective units and received more pay. Generally, the musicians were men that were older and not considered fit for regular army service, however that was not always the case. Many were young boys that were too young to serve in the regular army. The uniform the musician wore also differed somewhat from the uniform of the regular army. Enemy forces did not consider musicians, who were unarmed, as combatants and generally would not shoot them. The musician had to learn scores of songs ranging from popular tunes to the tattoos played at dawn and reveille, which played at day’s end.  Musicians also played an important role in maintaining the morale of the army.

Fife

Similar in appearance to a piccolo, the fife is generally made from a single piece of hardwood. Hardwoods favored for fife construction include blackwood, grenadilla, rosewood, mopane, pink ivory, cocobolo, boxwood, maple and persimmon. The fife has six finger holes along the tube that allow the player to produce different sounds. The player produces these sounds by blowing across a hole near the bottom of the instrument called an embouchure. The high pitched sound produced by the instrument in accompaniment with the drum creates a sound audible to soldiers engaged in battle.

Drum

The snare, or side, drum is the most common type of drum used in a military band. This drum has two heads, the batter head and the snare head. The drummer beats the batter head with two drum sticks to create the drumming sound and uses the snare head, which consists of gut twine, to produce the “buzzy,” sound. Prior to European use of drums certain African tribes used the drum in war as well as in certain regions of India. Islamic forces invading Europe used kettledrums to create unease in European armies’ horses, which had not been exposed to drums before. The Swiss had the first recorded drums armies for military use in the 13th Century.

The Music

At the beginning of the war the music played by the various bands varied from place to place, causing a great deal of confusion, especially during a battle. In 1777 Prussian General Baron Von Steuben came to the colonies. He played a key role in standardizing military drill, discipline, camp sanitation and procedure. He also assigned fife major Lieutenant John Hiwell to standardize the music played in the Continental Army.

Sample Chapter – Suppling the Armies – Gunpowder

Sample Chapter

Suppling the Armies

Gunpowder

Classed as a “low explosive” substance, gunpowder produces a large amount of pressure and gas after a rapid burn. This explosion of gas and pressure is ideal for propelling a projectile down the barrel of a firearm or cannon, as it is not intense enough to destroy the device. Gunpowder is composed of three ingredients, potassium nitrate, carbon and sulfur. Sulfur comprises the smallest component at about ten percent. The colonies imported it from Sicily, which has huge deposits. Carbon, the next biggest component at about fifteen percent,  they could manufacture from charcoal, an abundant resource made by burning wood. Potassium nitrate is the most important at seventy-five percent and is the most difficult to obtain.

Potassium Nitrate

Potassium nitrate, or salt peter, accumulates in caves as the composted remains of bat manure, or guano. The substance acts as an oxidizer during the explosion, decomposing high temperatures. It provides oxygen for gunpowder’s chemical reaction when ignited. The early colonists knew of no natural sources of salt peter in the New World. Sources were found later on, but the need for this critical material during the Revolutionary War forced the colonists to find foreign sources. There is another way to produce salt peter, but it is a long process. Any organic matter that contains nitrogen is a potential source for potassium nitrate. Manure, blood from slaughterhouses, plant material of all kinds they gathered and put in a huge pile. They would water this pile from time to time with animal and human urine. This pile of organic matter would decompose, leaving compost behind. They would then leach the salt peter out of this compost with water. They could then recrystallize the salt peter by evaporating the resulting liquid in the sun. This process typically took a year to produce the salt peter needed for gunpowder. Caves in the Appalachian Mountains mountain provided another source, as the bats that lived in them produced an ample supply of guano from which they could procure saltpeter.

Ingredients and Recipe

Charcoal

Gunpowder manufacturers could use charcoal made from a variety of sources, however charcoal made from wood made the best, most powerful, gunpowder. Manufacturers also used charcoal made from other materials like grapevine, hazel, elder, laurel and even pine cones. Most manufacturers prefer light woods because they leave less ash after the charring process than heavier woods like oak, hickory and maple. Gunpowder mills in during the Colonial and Revolutionary period in the United States preferred to use cottonwood, soft pine and cedar. To make charcoal, they tended to cut trees between two and ten years old in the spring. At this time the trees contained the most sap, which lessens the dissolved salt content in the wood which creates less ash when charred. At this time of year it is also easier to debark the trees. Bark produces more ash when charred, so they preferred not to use it. After cutting and debarking they cut the wood into pieces about three feet long, split the pieces and placed them in an iron cylinder called a slip. After sealing the ends of the cylinder, they placed the slips in huge ovens to bake. The cylinders were placed in such a way as to expose its entire surface to the flames to produce an even temperature. They used different temperatures and baking times to produce different types of gunpowder, however generally it took from between three to six hours at approximately 300 degrees.

Sulfur

Sulfur and charcoal, or carbon, act as the fuel that provides the explosion when the gunpowder is ignited. Natural sources of sulfur were scarce in North America at this time, thus most sulfur was imported from the volcanic regions of Italy..

The Situation at the Beginning of the War

An army needed gunpowder to function. At the beginning of the Revolutionary War the supply of gunpowder available to Washington’s fledgling army proved wholly inadequate to its needs. One reason that the Siege of Boston lasted so long is that Washington did not have an adequate supply of gunpowder to evict the British from the city. Historians estimate that the amount of powder available in early 1775 was only sufficient to supply each soldier with about 20 cartridges. In a heated battle, this would last less than 15 minutes. The powder stored in magazines had been there since the end of the French and Indian War in 1763. The end of that war had ended the need to produce vast quantities of gunpowder and the colonial powder mills that produced it had fallen into disuse. The men that knew how to make the critical substance were also in short supply. It was cheaper to produce gunpowder in England and ship it to the colonies than it was to produce it locally, so domestic production had become almost extinct. If British General Howe, cooped up in Boston, had gained information on the sorry state of the rebel’s gunpowder supplies he could have ended the revolution before it had a chance to start.

Supplying the Armies

Description:

Keeping an army in the field supplied with food, clothing, munitions and all the other necessities to keep a soldier fighting requires a complex network of departments within an army. Supplying the Armies will provide readers with an understanding of the task that faced the British and Continental Armies as they struggled for dominance.

Published Sometime in late 2020 or 2021

Sample Chapter

 

Buy Direct from Author
Softbound Price – $

Pay Pal Button Here

Visit Mossy Feet Books on Facebook

Other Books in the Series

Available In Multiple Formats – Ebook And Softbound:

Kindle

Amazon Softbound

Barnes & Noble

Barnes & Noble – Softbound

Kobo

Google Play

Scribid

24 Symbols

Walmart Books

Apple
.

Wholesale Pricing Available
For more information, contact:
Mossyfeetbooks@gmail.com
Orders over $50.00 Free Shipping

Twitter

Linkedin

YouTube

Pinterest

Paul Wonning’s Books on Amazon Page
Paul Wonning’s Books on Scribd Page

Paul Wonning’s Books on Apple

Paul Wonning’s Books on Kobo

Paul Wonning’s Books on Barnes and Noble

Paul Wonning’s Books on 24 Symbols

Paul Wonning’s Books on Google Play

Paul Wonning’s Books on Indigo

Paul Wonning’s Books on Playster

Paul Wonning’s Books on OverDrive

Search Paul Wonning on Ingrams

Top of Page

© 2020 Paul Wonning