Sample Chapter – Indiana’s Timeless Tales – 1792 – 1794 Early Indiana

Sample Chapter
Indiana’s Timeless Tales – 1792 – 1794
January 01, 1792 – Early Indiana
In early 1792, the region that would become Indiana consisted of land claimed by the various Indian tribes that lived in the dense forests, swamps and prairies, traveling and using the fishes of the rivers and streams as a valuable food source.
Settlements
In 1792, only three settlements existed in the future state, Vincennes, Clarksville and Jeffersonville. Cincinnati, located in the southwest corner of the future state of Ohio served as capital of the Northwest Territory. All of these settlements lay along major rivers.
Northwest Territory
Major John Hamtramck commanded Fort Knox I at Vincennes, constructed in 1787, was the westernmost fort of the United States. Arthur St. Clair governor of the Northwest Territory, which included the lands comprising the future states of Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Michigan, Wisconsin and a portion of Minnesota.
Settlement
The great cost of waging the Revolutionary War had left the government of the United States with an almost overwhelming debt that the new nation could not pay. The lands of the Northwest Territory beckoned, providing a means of paying the soldiers that fought the war. The United States granted land to Revolutionary War veterans, who began moving into the areas north of the Ohio River granted to them. The land also provided a much needed cash flow medium, as the government could have tracts of land surveyed and sold off to the public. The government established land offices for people to buy this land. These people also moved into their new holdings, many of which were north of the Ohio River. Amerindian tribes that lived in the region saw these new settlers as a threat to their way of life. They also viewed them as a violation Treaty of Fort Stanwix, signed in 1768, that set the border between the whites and the Amerindians at the Ohio River. The United States, with great reluctance, created an army to deal with the threat. However, the government did not give this early army the resources it needed to succeed. This policy led to the disasters of General Harmar in 1790 and St. Clair’s Defeat (Battle of the Wabash) in 1791. After the disastrous Battle of the Wabash, the United States set out on a different course to enlarge its settled territory.

Indiana’s Timeless Tales – 1792 – 1794

Indiana’s Timeless Tales – 1792 – 1794

Indiana’s Timeless Tales  – 1792 – 1794

The Northwest Indian War
Description:Explore Indiana’s early history using this journal of history stories from the beginning days of the Northwest Territory. A Timeline of Indiana History – 1792 – 1794 relates the time line of events that occurred between St. Clair’s Defeat to, and including the Battles of Fort Recovery and Fallen Timbers. Many of these stories of the Northwest Indian War are little known and obscure historical tales that the reader will enjoy learning.
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Other Books in the Series
Indiana’s Timeless Tales – Pre-History to 1781
Indiana’s Timeless Tales – 1782 – 1791
Indiana’s Timeless Tales  – 1792 – 1794
Indiana History Time Line Boxed Set

Available only from the AuthorAll Volumes in the Series

Available In Multiple Formats – Ebook And Softbound:
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Amazon Softbound
Playster
Barnes & Noble
Barnes & Noble – Softbound
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Sample Chapter – Indiana’s Timeless Tales – 1782 – 1791 – John Van Cleve Family

Indiana’s Timeless Tales – 1782 – 1791

Sample Chapter

Indiana’s Timeless Tales 1782 – 1791

1782 – 1791 – John Van Cleve Family

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December 06, 1785 – John Van Cleve Family Arrives Washington, Pennsylvania
Blacksmith John Van Cleve, his wife Catherine and eight children arrive at Washington, Pennsylvania.
John Van Cleve (May 16, 1749 – June 1, 1791)
The son of Benjamin and Rachel Covenhoven Van Cleve, John was native to New Brunswick, Middlesex County, New Jersey Colony. At fifteen, John apprenticed to a blacksmith in Freehold, New Jersey. By 1771, John had finished his apprenticeship and established a blacksmith shop. That year he met, and married, Catherine Benham. The couple would have nine children, three of whom would die in infancy.
American Revolution
After the Battles of Lexington and Concord occurred, the New Jersey militia mobilized. John enlisted in the militia and served in his father’s company. In that capacity, he acted as a guide for Captain Daniel Morgan’s company of Riflemen. He continued to serve in the New Jersey militia after Morgan’s capture at the Battle of Quebec on December 31, 1775. He served under General David Forman of the Continental Army during the American loss at the Battle of Germantown on October 4, 1777. After the battle, the British occupied Philadelphia. Van Cleve joined scouting parties that harassed British troops that had left the city to search for supplies.
Battle of Monmouth
By May of 1778, the British departed Philadelphia and began their march towards New York. General Washington pursued them, catching them at Monmouth, New Jersey, resulting in the Battle of Monmouth on June 28, 1778. Van Cleve’s family fled in confusion to the Pine Swamps as the battle developed around them. John left them to help Morgan’s company reorganize itself in the confusion of battle. Musket fire terrified the hiding family as the battle raged. The Americans prevailed, driving the British from the field, leaving devastation in their wake. The British had cut down the orchards, killed livestock and left the countryside in a state of charred destruction. John found his anvil in the ruins of his blacksmith shop and all that remained alive was a heifer and a sow that had its back broken by a British saber. This was the last battle of the Revolution that John served in during the Revolution.
Move to Washington, Pennsylvania
John’s brother in law, Robert Benham, had settled in Washington, Pennsylvania, which is southwest of Pittsburg. He had traveled in early 1785 to Van Cleve’s home in Freehold to visit John and convince him to near his home near the Monongahela River. John finally agreed to migrate, so the family, which had lived in the New Jersey area for over 100 years, decided to pull up stakes and move to the frontier area of southwestern Pennsylvania.
The Beginning
The family spent most of the summer preparing for the move. Finally, on November 2, 1785 the caravan of four wagons, eight horses and the entire Van Cleve family boarded their wagons and began the long journey to Washington, Pennsylvania. His thirteen-year-old son, Benjamin drove the lead wagon, with his mother beside him. Robert Benham drove another wagon and John’s apprentice Tunis Voorheis drove another. Two of the daughters, ages seven and ten, walked alongside the wagon while four-year-old William and one-year-old George rode in the wagon with their mother. John rode a horse and rode ahead to scout the path. The author does not know who drove the fourth wagon. Three wagons held the family’s possessions, the fourth John’s blacksmith supplies.
The Journey
The family covered thirty miles the first day, the most they would cover for the entire thirty-four day journey of almost 400 miles. The camped about sixteen miles from Philadelphia in country that had been almost denuded of forests after almost 100 years of settlement. The next day they managed to find the Pennsylvania Road, which was little more than a rutted path leading west into the densely forested hilly area of southern Pennsylvania. Travel was slow. The road had no bridges, so the family had to ford each river and stream. The road ascended the steep hills using hairpin curves to gain the summit. The hills were so steep, they had to unhitch two horses from one wagon and add it to the next so the horses could gain the summit. After reaching the summit, they tied ropes to the wagons and lowered them down using raw muscle until they got to into the valley. They would then start the process over again for the next wagon until all were down. Then they would ascend the next hill. As winter approached, the family endured snow and ice. Wagons broke down periodically, and they would lose a day repairing the wagon. At length, they reached their destination on December 6, 1785. They lived in the Washington Pennsylvania area until 1790, when they would once again migrate to Losantiville in the Northwest Territory.

Indiana’s Timeless Tales – 1782 – 1791

Indiana’s Timeless Tales – 1782 – 1791 is a fascinating time line of events in the Northwest Territory that occurred before Indiana was a state. This volume covers events from the inception of the Northwest Territory until the tragic events surrounding St. Claire’s Defeat.

Indiana’s Timeless Tales – 1782 – 1791
The Northwest Territory – Book 1

Description:
Indiana’s Timeless Tales – 1782 – 1791 is a fascinating time line of events in the Northwest Territory that occurred before Indiana was a state. This volume covers events from the inception of the Northwest Territory until the tragic events surrounding St. Claire’s Defeat. 
Preview Chapter
Buy Direct from Author
Softbound Price – $ 12.99

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Other Books in the Series
Indiana’s Timeless Tales – Pre-History to 1781
Indiana’s Timeless Tales – 1782 – 1791
Indiana’s Timeless Tales  – 1792 – 1794
Indiana History Time Line Boxed Set

Available only from the Author

All Volumes in the Series
Available In Multiple Formats – Ebook And Softbound:

Draft to Digital Universal Link
Kindle
Amazon Softbound
Playster
Barnes & Noble
Barnes & Noble – Softbound
Kobo
Google Play
Scribid
24 Symbols
Walmart Books
Apple


Wholesale Pricing Available
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Sample Chapter – Indiana’s Timeless Tales – Pre-History to 1781 – Shawnees in Indiana

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Sample Chapter
Indiana’s Timeless Tales
Pre-History to 1781
Shawnees in Indiana
Shawnees in Indiana
The Shawnee name derives from the Shawnee word “shawanwa,” which means “southerner” in the native language. The tribe speaks a form of Algonquian, which makes the tribe akin to the Delaware, Illiniwek, Kickapoo, Menominee, Miami, and Sauk and Fox tribes. Range
The Shawnee were a semi-nomadic tribe and lived in villages scattered over a large area in the Ohio River Valley, Pennsylvania and originally in the Shenandoah Valley in Virginia. Conflict with the Iroquois tribes in the Ohio River Valley drove them off for a number of years. The Iroquois did not live in the Ohio River Valley; however, they wanted the region because it was a prime hunting area. The Iroquois wanted the abundant fur supply to trade with the Europeans. The Iroquois’ power began declining, and the Shawnee were able to migrate back into the Ohio River Valley, Kentucky and central Ohio. During the middle years of the 1700’s, they had settled into three main areas in Indiana, the southwestern, southeastern and the northeast region around Fort Wayne. Some bands also moved into the White and Mississinewa rivers region.
Shawnee Dress
Both men and women wore leggings. Men wore breechclouts while women wore skirts over the leggings. Neither sex wore shirts, but wore ponchos in cold weather. Some of the men wore a beaded headband with one or two feathers stuck in the back. They did not wear headdresses. Warriors would sometimes shave their heads.
Shawnee Lifestyle
The Shawnee men did the hunting. They also were the warriors that fought both white encroachment and other tribes to protect their hunting lands, or gain lands from other tribes. The women took care of the children, did the cooking and tended the crops. Both sexes engaged in storytelling, an important part of their culture. During the summer, the tribes lived in larger villages to plant and tend their garden crops. In winter, these villages would split up into smaller groups to live in hunting camps. The Shawnee constructed dugout canoes to travel over water and used dogs to transport goods overland. Prior to the European arrival, the natives did not have horses.
Shawnee Villages
The Shawnee lived in a bark-covered structure called a wikkum, or wigwam. These structures were easy to build, but are not portable. Most families would build a new one each season when they moved into their seasonal winter camps or summer villages. The structure consisted of wooden poles covered with bark or grass. They used rope or strips of bark to hold the covering in place. These wigwams were usually eight to ten feet tall and could be cone shaped, round or rectangular. A village typically had a larger council house.
Shawnee Agriculture
Maize was the most important crop, and most tribes grew some. If they did not grow it, they traded for it. They also grew beans, squash, pumpkins, sunflowers and probably potatoes. They also gathered honey, nuts, berries and other fruits. Tribes tried to grow enough food to dry for storage over the winter.
Shawnee Hunting
The Shawnee diet was largely meat based. The men hunted the forests for deer and wild turkeys with bow and arrow. They also fished in the streams and sometimes used traps and snares to catch smaller game like rabbit and squirrel.
Shawnee Meals
Most of the meals were simple to prepare. They would eat corn on the cob when fresh maize was available. They also popped the corn and ground it into meal to make into cornbread or hominy. They used clay ovens to bake the cornbread. They roasted meat over the fire or on heated stones. Usually they had water with their meals.
Shawnee Politics
Each village had its own chief. The village chief could be a man or a woman. They chose their war chief based on his bravery and skill in battle. The war chief was always a male. A principal chief held sway over several villages and was always a male. Chiefs had considerable power, but held it only as long as they had the support of their people. If they grew unpopular, the people could replace them.
To contact the Shawnee tribe, visit this link:
The Shawnee Tribe
P.O. Box 189
29 S Hwy 69A
Miami OK 74355
918-542-2441
http://www.shawnee-tribe.com/

Indiana’s Timeless Tales – Pre-History to 1781

Indiana’s Timeless Tales – Pre-History to 1781
Hoosier Historical Events
Description:

Discover Indiana’s history as it unfolds from pre-history until the beginning of the American experiment. Indiana’s Timeless Tales – Pre-History to 1781 presents the unfolding saga of Indiana’s fascinating history in an easy to follow time line. Readers will learn both famous and forgotten, obscure events in Indiana’s story.

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Sample Chapter
Buy Direct from Author
Softbound Price – $ 12.99





Available only from the AuthorAll Volumes in the Series
Available In Multiple Formats – Ebook And Softbound:
Kindle
Amazon Softbound
Playster
Barnes & Noble
Barnes & Noble – Softbound
Kobo
Google Play
Scribid
24 Symbols
Apple
Walmart Books

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Wholesale Pricing Available
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Paul Wonning’s Books on 24 Symbols
Paul Wonning’s Books on Google Play
Paul Wonning’s Books on Indigo
Paul Wonning’s Books on Playster
Paul Wonning’s Books on OverDrive
Search Paul Wonning on Ingrams