Quest of the Wizard – Epic Fantasy Novel

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Quest of the Wizard – Epic Fantasy Novel
Book 1 – Wizards of the Golden Star Series
The horrible monster Gwaum has the Six Kingdoms under assault. He has created a world of terror as he plunges through the land seeking his bloody diet of living humans on which he must feed. The panicked, terrified refugees hiding in the forests and mountains have little hope to end the slaughter and stop the creature that threatens to destroy their world.
Quest of the Wizard is the first compelling tale in the Wizards of the Golden Star Series.

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Also In This Series
Quest of the Wizard
Kingdoms in Chaos
Wizard’s Tales
Legend of the Wizard Tarque
The Rise of the Pirate King
The Wizard King





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Sample Chapter – Home Electric Systems – Circuit Breakers

Sample Chapter

Home Electric Systems

Circuit Breakers


Below the main circuit breaker in the panel you will find the branch circuit breakers. Each circuit breaker controls one circuit in the home. The electrician that installed the electrical system will have placed labels by each breaker identifying the circuit, or appliance, that the breaker controls. The dryer, water heater, water pump and heating system usually have their own circuit. Other circuits may be labeled “Kitchen,” Living Room,” “Bathroom,” etc. The breaker acts like an electrical switch. Turning it “off,” will shut off all the power in that circuit. The circuit breaker is designed to detect power overloads, short circuits and other electrical malfunctions in the home. The most common reason for a circuit breaker to trip to the off position is an overload. If you are using a vacuum cleaner or some other appliance on a circuit and the circuit breaker trips, you have probably overloaded the circuit. Move the appliances plug to another circuit, go to the circuit panel, note the one in the “Off,” position. Simply flip it to the “On,” position. If it continues to trip, you may have an electrical problem. Leave it turned off and call an electrician. Circuit breakers are available in different amp classifications. The higher the number, the more amps it will handle before tripping. You can turn off the power to any circuit in the home by flipping the appropriate circuit breaker to the “Off,” position. To turn back on, simply flip the breaker back to ,”On.”
Some circuit breaker sizes you may see on your panel include:
15 amp breakers
20 amp breakers
40 amp breakers
50 amp breakers
60 amp breakers
100 amp breakers
200 amp breakers
15 and 20 amp breakers are the most common. Most homes will not have circuit breakers rated at higher than 40 amp, unless it is the main circuit breaker, which commonly is 200 amp.

Home Energy Systems

Description:

Home Energy Systems will be a basic guide to the home’s electrical system, its components, major appliances as well as a guide on batteries and other electrical components of the home. 

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Home Water Systems

Home Water Systems

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Home Water Systems is a primer for the homeowner about water sources like lakes, streams and wells. It provides a basic overview of water filtration systems, wells and other water sources for the home.

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A History of the United States Constitution

A History of the United States Constitution
A Guide to the United States Founding Documents

The story of the United States Constitution begins with the Albany Plan of Union in 1754 and stretches into modern times with the Bill of Rights and subsequent amendments. A Short History of the United States Constitution relates its history as well as many of the documents leading up to it.

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Riding the Great Smokey Mountain Railroad

Riding the Great Smokey Mountain Railroad
Riding the Great Smokey Mountain Railroad

Riding the Great Smokey Mountain Railroad
Majestic vistas, charming towns and sparking mountain streams caress the eyes of riders of the Great Smoky Mountain Railroad. Ride the rails in comfort, using this book, Riding the Great Smokey Mountain Railroad as your travel guide.

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Other Books in the Series
The Alaska Chronicles – Our Alaskan Cruise Adventure
The Hawaiian Chronicles – Our Hawaiian Adventures
Riding the Great Smokey Mountain Railroad

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The Hawaiian Chronicles – Our Hawaiian Adventures

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The Hawaiian Chronicles – Our Hawaiian Adventures
The Hawaiian Chronicles – Our Hawaiian Adventures serves as both a journal of our Hawaiian cruise adventure and as a guide of the various types of cruises available for visitors to tour our 50th State. It is possible for vacationers to tour all of the major islands on a single, seven-day journey. This guide does not attempt to cover all of the destination to visit on the islands. The Hawaiian Chronicles – Our Hawaiian Adventures lists the major cruise lines and the types of cruises they offer. Contact information for the cruise lines is included in the book.

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The Hawaiian Chronicles – Our Hawaiian Adventures
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Sample Chapter – Alaska Chronicles – Day Two

Sample Chapter

Alaska Chronicles

Day Two

The day dawned bright and beautiful, though rather cool. We were sort of “jet lagged” out, and overslept. I felt like something the dogs had been rolling in. However, we were in Alaska, the first day of eleven days of playing tourist.
The Hotel Captain Cook in Anchorage, as I mentioned earlier, is a first class establishment. We were on the ninth floor with a magnificent view of the city. The lower floor, at street level, contains a half dozen or so small gift stores. We had browsed some of these the evening before. Princess Cruise Line staffs a small office here. Our first stop the previous evening was to get information as about our departure time today and other things we needed to know.
After breakfast at the Sandwich Deck, we again strolled around Anchorage. As our tour bus was leaving at 11:00 AM, we didn’t have a lot of time to do much. So we just walked a couple of streets that we had missed the night before and retraced our route to Resolution Park. The weather was clear this morning and Mt. McKinley, about 110 miles distant, was barely visible to the north of Anchorage.
By 10:30, the cruise line had collected our luggage. We went downstairs to the lobby to await the tour bus for our trip to the Alaskan Heritage Center. The bus showed up on time and we boarded. It was perhaps a twenty-minute ride to the center. This is a interesting museum. It contains many exhibits of native Alaskan culture, from the homes the natives lived in, the clothes they wore, and much more. The most fascinating thing to me was the construction of the kayak. The wooden structure of this watercraft fits together intricately. It was custom-built for the hunter who would be using it. After building the frame, the ladies of the tribe covered it with sealskin that had to be fitted and sewn exactly right. Too loose, and it would slide out of place. Too tight and it would crush the wooden framework of the kayak as it dried. The engineering and craftsmanship, which went into constructing one of these craft, was intriguing.
After two hours of touring the Cultural Center, our bus driver took us back to the Captain Cook. We had just barely enough time to eat lunch at the Sandwich Deck. We boarded another bus for the journey out to the Kenai Princess Lodge, scheduled to leave at 1:30.

Brian would be our bus driver for this trek, a chatty fellow who regaled us with stories and Alaskan lore on our bus ride. Our route would follow Alaska Highway 1, the Seward Highway, southeast along the Turnagain Arm of the Cook Inlet. The Turnagain Arm would be on our right on the first part of the journey, the mountainous Chugach National Forest on our right. Glaciers glinted in the sunlight on the crests of mountains, and in some of the higher valleys between them. Aspen formed thickets near the highway, good moose habitat, the driver said. In addition, we did catch a glimpse of one, head barely above the vegetation as we passed by.

As the road reached the end of the Arm, it turned first south, then northeast. Then it finally heads southwest as it reached into the Kenai Peninsula, towards our goal. The distance traveled was approximately 100 miles. The mountains were now on both sides of the road, as we left the Turnagain Arm behind us. More heavily forested, the land displayed a rugged beauty and isolation I could never have imagined before. There were no houses, towns, or villages. There were just the mountains, forest, and glaciers.
We stopped at the Alaska Wildlife Refuge that operates a display area of wild animals along the highway. There are large fenced in areas here for elk, black tailed deer, bison, caribou, moose, and black bears. Most of these animals are orphans raised by humans. They would not survive if released into the wild. I still felt sorry for them, caged behind the fences. The driver drove the bus to one end of the loop drive, and allowed some of us to walk back to the Visitor Center, about ¼ mile. Lynne, I, and a few others exited the bus to stretch our legs and see the animals up closer than the bus would allow.

It was windy, but the walk back allowed our first real panorama of the wild Alaskan countryside. Glaciated mountains surrounded us with blue sky and golden sun overhead.
After about a half hour, we reentered the bus and Brian was ready to start rolling again. We waited for the remaining passengers to board. The lady in front of us on the bus had lowered the blind on the window, blocking my view. Since she had not returned, I took the opportunity to raise the blind so I could see out. Once under way, she lost no time in lowering the blind again. The passengers on the other side had lowered theirs as well. So here we were, riding through some of the most spectacular scenery I have ever been in and the blinds were down on the windows! I just as well had been riding in a barrel. I concluded that while touring by bus freed me from the chore of driving, I would not be doing much of it in the future.
As I mentioned, Brian the bus driver kept up a constant monologue. He talks about Alaskan culture, politics, landmarks and points of interest that we were passing.
Tidbits included:
The name Turnagain Arm originated because of the glacial silt that collects on the bottom of the inlet. This causes the water to be quite shallow. The bottom of the channel shifts and changes constantly. Boats in the inlet are forced to “turn again” as they encounter the silt and have to change direction. The inlet not charted and probably unchartable. Because of this, you don’t see many boats in the inlet.
Election is hard for an Alaskan politician without a photo of himself or herself holding a gun. Thus, the petite Lisa Murkowski publicized a photo with her holding a double-barreled shotgun during her Senate campaign. It got her elected.
The glaciers absorb the copper in the soil in an oxidized form. This causes the green color of the glacial rivers and streams. The glaciers melt and the resulting runoff has a unique patina color. The water is safe to drink, and Brian asserted that he has drunk it many times.
Moose like to live in their food. Therefore, they are usually hard to spot as they hunker down in thickets of small alder and birch.
Anchorage continues to grow in population. The number of schoolchildren in Alaskan public schools declines. This is because of the increasing popularity of private schools and home schooling. The school enrollment has declined by about thirty percent in the last decade. Funding for the public schools has almost doubled.
We arrived at our destination, the Kenai Princess Lodge near Coopers Landing around 4:30 PM. We boarded a shuttle bus at the lodge and transported to our cabin further up the mountain. We were in room 1110, a spacious room that included a bedroom, sitting room, large bathroom and a porch. The porch afforded a great view of the surrounding mountains. A wood stove resided in the sitting room, and an ample supply of birch firewood waited burning in the firebox outside the cabin. Birch and fir trees surrounded the cabin, creating a secluded atmosphere. A walk around the grounds provides spectacular vistas of the surrounding mountains.

There is also a short nature hike here which can either be one half mile, or one mile, depending on which loop is taken. We never got around to hiking this trail due to our short stay here.
We settled into our room and did minimal unpacking, as we would be here only two nights. We strolled around the grounds, and walked down to the Kenai River. There is a short loop trail here that features three overlooks to the river. We spotted salmon in the water as they were making their way up river to spawn. The river has a rich patina color. It is beautiful as it tumbles and cascades over submerged rocks on its way to Cooks Inlet at Anchorage, about 35 miles away.
We returned to the lodge, climbing the steep hill. The lodge provides a shuttle that will take you up and down the hill to this beautiful and relaxing spot. There is a small shelter at the base of the hill with a
telephone in it for people to call to the lodge for a shuttle if an unexpected shower strands them. You may use this service also if you can’t make it back up the hill. It is a fairly long and taxing hike back up the hill.

The lodge features two restaurants. Due to the isolated nature of the hotel, these are the only dining choices available for bus tourists without a vehicle. The Eagles Crest, which has an exclusive, pricey menu, and the Rafter’s Lounge. The Rafters Lounge has more reasonably priced fare with a more “sports bar” type atmosphere. The food is good, and the service from the staff is adequate. There is a deck available for dining which overlooks the Kenai River with mountains in the background. It is a restful spot to dine.
There is a gift shop on the grounds of the Lodge that we browsed in after dinner. The gift shop abounds with nice merchandise of all kinds. This ranges from from t-shirts and hats to magnets, locally made items, and many other unique wares.

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The Alaska Chronicles – Our Alaskan Cruise Adventure

The Alaska Chronicles
The Alaska Chronicles

An Alaskan cruise is a wonderful experience. Cruising Alaska’s shoreline reveals a world of majestic mountains and wild rivers.

Taking an Alaskan cruise can be the experience of a lifetime. The Alaska Chronicles –Our Alaskan Cruise Adventure relates our experiences on an Alaskan cruise. Or cruising Alaska experience left us with memories that would last a lifetime.

The Alaska Chronicles –Our Alaskan Cruise Adventure contains not just experiences about our cruise. It also contains information about both big ship and small ship Alaskan cruises. Use this guide to help you decide just what kind of Alaskan cruise you want to take. A big ship cruise experience offers luxury, convenience and plenty of Alaskan culture. A small ship Alaskan cruise provides a more intimate of Alaska because it can put you into places a big cruise cannot get into. The smaller ships have fewer passengers and thus the crew personnel can give more personal attention.

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This guide contains cruise line contact information and the possible itineraries of the cruises
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Other Books in the Series
The Alaska Chronicles – Our Alaskan Cruise Adventure
The Hawaiian Chronicles – Our Hawaiian Adventures
Riding the Great Smokey Mountain Railroad

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Sample Chapter – Indiana’s Role in the Civil War – Civil War Memorial Grave 1865

Sample Chapter

Indiana’s Role in the Civil War

Civil War Memorial Grave 1865

Visitors to Magnet, Indiana will find this historical marker honoring the deaths of ten soldiers of the 70th Ohio Infantry that died when the boiler exploded on the steamboat steamboat they were riding in back to their homes in Ohio.

Title of Marker:
Civil War Memorial Grave 1865
Location:
CR 36 next to Ohio River and right before paved road turns to gravel, 0.5 mile south of Magnet. (Perry County, Indiana)
Installed by:
Erected by Indiana Civil War Centennial Commission, 1965
Marker ID #:
62.1965.1
Marker Text:
On August 21, 1865, the steamer, U.S.S. Argosy, (Number 3), was caught in a storm, blown aground and her boilers exploded. Ten fatalities occurred among Union soldiers returning home from war service. They were buried in a mass grave one half mile from Magnet (Rono) where memorial markers perpetuate this burial ground.

Brief History
Tragedy befell the soldiers of the 70th Ohio Infantry as they returned from their duty during the Civil War aboard the U.S.S. Argosy 3 when a storm blew them against a rock near Magnet, Indiana. Ten of the soldiers died in the tragedy.
U.S.S. Argosy, (Number 3)
The US Navy had three ships named Argosy during the Civil War. Built in 1862, U.S.S. Argosy #1 was a stern-wheeler that the US Navy purchased and converted into supply ship and gunboat. By coincidence, it was the U.S.S. Argosy #1 that picked the survivors up after the tragedy involving U.S.S. Argosy # 3. U.S.S. Argosy #2 was constructed in 1863 and sold to the Navy the same year. The Confederates captured this ship in May 1864. U.S.S. Argosy #3, built in 1864, was not a regular government ship. It was a shipping boat that the military had requisitioned temporarily to transport returning troops home.
70th Ohio Infantry
Under the command of Colonel Joseph R. Cockerill, the 70th Ohio mustered into service on October 14, 1861 at Union Ohio. The regiment had extensive service in Kentucky, Tennessee and lastly, in Arkansas. The regiment mustered out on August 14, 1865 at Little Rock, Arkansas. They were transported to Cairo, Illinois. 300 of the soldiers boarded the U.S.S. Argosy #3. At Magnet, Indiana, they would have a terrible interruption to their long, weary journey.
Magnet, Indiana
A man named Dodson founded a woodyard on the banks of the Ohio River at a place he called Dodson’s Landing. Dodson sold his woodyard to Jesse Martin, who renamed the spot Martin’s Landing. When residents chose a name for the village in 1848, they named it Rono, after Martin’s dog. The United States Postal Department changed this name to Magnet in 1899. The town is about half way between Owensboro and Louisville, Kentucky. It is about six miles east of Indiana State Road 66. To get there, turn east on Ultra Road. After about a quarter of a mile, turn right on Parks Road (CR 35). Parks Road runs into Magnet. To get to the marker, turn left on East Buzzard’s Roost Road (County Road 36). Turn right just before the paved road turns to gravel road.
The Accident
The boat had rounded a turn in the river called Ox Bow Bend when a thunderstorm blew up. Many of the soldiers took shelter from the blowing wind and rain in the boiler-room. The storm blew the boat against a submerged rock ledge. The rock tore the steam pipes apart, scalding many of the soldiers. The boat nearly capsized and many of the soldiers jumped overboard. After the boat righted and the officers restored order, they took roll. Eight men were missing and presumed drowned in the Ohio River. Two men died of their burns. The U.S.S. Argosy # 1 transported the survivors to Louisville. There, another ship, the Captain Lytle, continued the journey of the 70th Ohio back to Ohio. After repairs, the U.S.S. Argosy # 3 returned to service.