Colonial American History Stories – 1770 – 1774

 Colonial American History Stories - 1770 – 1774
 Colonial American History Stories
1770 – 1774

Visit Mossy Feet Books on Facebook

 Colonial American History Stories – 1770 – 1774 features an historical chronicle of the pre-revolutionary years of the United States. The time line presents a journal of events that led to the conflict between the British and their North American colonists. The events, some obscure and almost forgotten, played a role in the developing drama that eventually led to American independence.

Softbound Price – $9.99
Buy Direct From Author
 $3.00 Shipping
More Options Below





Available On:
Draft to Digital Universal Link
Kindle
Amazon Softbound
Barnes & Noble
Barnes & Noble – Softbound
Kobo
Google Play
Scribid
24 Symbols
Apple
Vivlio
Walmart
Available in multiple ebook formats and softbound
Buy Paul Wonning’s At:

Wholesale Pricing Available
For more information, contact:
Mossyfeetbooks@gmail.com
Orders over $50.00 Free Shipping
Download the Mossy Feet Books catalog today for great reading.

Facebook
Mossy Feet Books

Twitter
Linkedin
YouTube
Pinterest
Paul Wonning’s Books on Amazon Page
Paul Wonning’s Books on Scribd Page
Draft 2 Digital – Universal Links
Paul Wonning’s Books on Apple
Paul Wonning’s Books on Kobo
Paul Wonning’s Books on Barnes and Noble
Paul Wonning’s Books on 24 Symbols
Paul Wonning’s Books on Google Play

Paul Wonning’s Books on Indigo

Paul Wonning’s Books on Playster

Paul Wonning’s Books on OverDrive

Search Paul Wonning on Ingrams
© 2018 Paul Wonning

Colonial American History Stories – 1763 – 1769

Colonial American History Stories - 1763 – 1769
Colonial American History Stories – 1763 – 1769

Colonial American History Stories – 1763 – 1769 contains dozens of history stories presented in a time line that begins in 1663 with the first issue of the Georgia Gazette and ends with  George Washington’s petition for the land promised soldiers who fought in the French and Indian War. The historical events include both famous ones as well as many little known, forgotten stories that the mists time have obscured. These reader friendly  stories include:
April 19, 1763 – Teedyuscung, King of the Delaware, Murdered in His Home
November 15, 1763 – Charles Mason And Jeremiah Dixon Begin Surveying Mason-Dixon Line
May 30, 1765 – First U.S. Medical College Opens In Philadelphia
October 1, 1765 – The State of British North America
May 1, 1769 – Daniel Boone Begins Exploring Kentucky
Softbound Price – $10.99
Buy Direct From Author





Available On:

Kindle
Amazon Softbound
Barnes & Noble
Barnes & Noble – Softbound
Kobo
Google Play
24 Symbols
Apple
Walmart
Vivilio
Facebook
Indiana Places
Abes Beer Garden
Stories of American History
Mossy Feet Books

Visit Mossy Feet Books on Facebook

Twitter
Linkedin
YouTube
Pinterest
Paul Wonning’s Books on Amazon Page
Paul Wonning’s Books on Smashwords Page
Paul Wonning’s Books on Apple
Paul Wonning’s Books on Kobo
Paul Wonning’s Books on Barnes and Noble
Paul Wonning’s Books on Createspace
Paul Wonning’s Books on Google Play
© Paul Wonning
© Paul Wonning 2020

Colonial American History Stories – 1753 – 1763

Colonial American History Stories - 1753 – 1763
Colonial American History Stories
1753 – 1763

Colonial American History Stories – 1753 – 1763 contains almost 300 history stories presented in a timeline that begins in 1655 with the performance of the first documented play performed in British North America and ends with the switch from the Julian to the Gregorian calendar in 1752. The historical events include both famous ones as well as many little known, forgotten stories that the mists time have obscured. These reader friendly stories include:
March 10, 1753- Liberty Bell Hung
April 9, 1754 – Slave Girl Priscilla Begins Her Horrible Journey
April 12, 1755 – Ben Franklin Receives Letter Describing Death by Tapeworm
November 01, 1756 – Samuel Adams Elected Tax Collector
June 28, 1762 – First Reported Counterfeiting Attempt at Boston

Visit Mossy Feet Books on Facebook

Buy Direct from the Author
$8.99 Softbound
$3.00 Shipping per Order





Available On:
Kindle
Amazon Softbound
Playster
Barnes & Noble
Barnes & Noble – Softbound
Kobo
Google Play
Scribid
24 Symbols
Apple
.Create Space – Softcover Book
Facebook
Indiana Places
Abes Beer Garden
Stories of American History
Mossy Feet Books

Twitter
Linkedin
YouTube
Pinterest
Paul Wonning’s Books on Amazon Page
Paul Wonning’s Books on Smashwords Page
Paul Wonning’s Books on Apple
Paul Wonning’s Books on Kobo
Paul Wonning’s Books on Barnes and Noble
Paul Wonning’s Books on Createspace
Paul Wonning’s Books on Google Play
© Paul Wonning
© Paul Wonning 2017 © Paul R. Wonning 2017

Colonial American History Stories – 1665 – 1753

Colonial American History Stories - 1665 – 1753
Colonial American History Stories – 1665 – 1753

Colonial American History Stories – 1665 – 1753 contains almost 300 history stories presented in a timeline that begins in 1655 with the performance of the first documented play performed in British North America and ends with the switch from the Julian to the Gregorian Calendar in 1752. The historical events include both famous ones as well as many little known, forgotten stories that the mists time have obscured. These reader friendly  stories include:
September 27, 1540 – Society of Jesus (Jesuits) Founded By Ignatius Loyola
December 19, 1675 – The Great Swamp Fight
September 19, 1676 – Bacon’s Rebellion – Bacon Burns Jamestown
April 18, 1689 – 1689 Boston Revolt
February 29, 1692 – Sarah Good, Sarah Osborne and Tituba Accused Of Witchcraft in Salem, Massachusetts
May 22, 1718 – Edward Teach – Blackbeard – Begins Blockade of Charlestown.
November 02, 1734 – Daniel Boone Born
December 08, 1741 – Vitus Bering Died
December 23, 1750 – Ben Franklin Attempts to Electrocute a Turkey
December 31, 1752 – Julian/Gregorian Calendar Switch Complete


Buy Direct from the Author
$14.99 Softbound
$3.00 Shipping per Order

Available In Multiple Formats – Ebook And Softbound:
Kindle
Amazon Softbound
Barnes & Noble
Barnes & Noble – Softbound
Kobo
Google Play
Scribid
24 Symbols
Walmart Books
Apple
Vivlio

Colonial American History Stories – 1215 – 1664

Colonial American History Stories – 1215 – 1664
Colonial American History Stories – 1215 – 1664 contains almost 300 history stories presented in a timeline that begins in 1215 with the signing of the Magna Carta to the printing of the first Bible in Colonial America in 1664. The historical events include both famous ones as well as many forgotten stories that the mists time have obscured. These reader friendly stories include:
June 15, 1215 – King John I signs Magna Carta at Runnymede England
October 19, 1469 – Ferdinand and Isabella Marry, Uniting Aragon and Castile
August 3, 1492 – Christopher Columbus Sets Sail On His First Voyage
July 22, 1587 – Lost Colony Established
June 14, 1623 – First Breach-Of-Promise Lawsuit In Colonies
August 29, 1619 ? – First Blacks Land at Jamestown Virginia

Buy Direct from the Author
$14.99 Softbound
$3.00 Shipping per Order






 Buy Direct from the Author
$60.00
All six volumes take you through colonial American history from Christopher Columbus’ first voyage to the beginning of the Revolution. Explore the fascinating years that shaped the United States. 
$72 Retail Value
$60.00 – 
$3.00 Shipping
Colonial American History Stories – 1215 – 1664Colonial American History Stories – 1665 – 1753Colonial American History Stories – 1753 – 1763Colonial American History Stories – 1763 – 1769Colonial American History Stories – 1770 – 1774An American Revolution Time Line – 1775
Available On:Kindle
Amazon Softbound
Barnes & Noble
Barnes & Noble – Softbound
Kobo
Google Play
Apple
Vivilio

Scribid

Walmart Books
Paul Wonning’s Books on Amazon Page
Paul Wonning’s Books on Smashwords Page
Paul Wonning’s Books on Apple
Paul Wonning’s Books on Kobo
Paul Wonning’s Books on Barnes and Noble

© Paul R. Wonning 2017

Preview Chapter – Short History of Roads and Highways – Thomas MacDonald

Preview Chapter 
Short History of Roads and Highways

Thomas MacDonald
The son of John and Sarah Elizabeth Harris MacDonald was native to Leadville, Colorado. During his childhood he received his education at elementary and high school at public schools in Montezuma, Iowa after his family moved to Iowa. His father owned lumber and grain dealerships, which required transportation of grain and lumber on horse drawn wooden wagons. The poor state of the roads, which were impassable for much of the year, disgusted him. He attended college Iowa State College of Agricultural and Mechanical Arts. He studied road building and became involved in the Good Roads movement after graduating with a bachelor’s degree in civil engineering in 1904. He married he married Elizabeth Dunham in 1907. The couple would have two children. He received appointment as the Assistant in Charge of Good Roads Investigation in Iowa that year. He became Iowa’s head civil engineer in 1913 and played an instrumental role in the passage of the Federal Aid Road Act of 1916. Congress appointed him as the head of the Bureau of Public Roads on July 1, 1919. He would remain at the head of the bureau until his retirement in 1953. During his tenure he was the chief architect of the highway system in the United States. The Federal Aid Highway Act of 1921 was his innovation. He supervised the construction of 3.5 million miles of highways and helped lay the foundation for Eisenhower’s U.S. Interstate Highway System

Sample Chapter – Short History of Roads and Highways – Charles Brady King

Sample Chapter
Short History of Roads and Highways
Charles Brady King (February 2, 1868 – June 22, 1957) The son of John Haskell and Matilda C. Davenport King, Charles was native to Angel Island, California. His father had served as a general during the American Civil War. When John retired from the Army in 1882, the family moved to Detroit, where Matilda’s family lived. King attended Trinity College in Port Hope, Ontario for two years, after which he enrolled in the Cascadilla School in Ithaca, New York. In 1887 he entered Cornell University until his father passed away in 1888. After his father’s death, he returned to Detroit. He took a job at a railroad car manufacturing company, the Michigan Car Company. He attended the Chicago World’s Fair in 1893 to exhibit the pneumatic hammer and brake beam that he had invented for use on railroad cars. During the exhibition, he saw a horseless carriage built by Gottlieb Daimler. He was inspired to build his own horseless carriage.
First Car in Detroit
In his spare time, King designed and built what many think is the first car in Detroit. King spent the next few years building the car and tested it in private from 1895 until he officially unveiled it on March 6, 1896. It was during this time that he helped organize the first automobile club in the United States, the American Motor League. He drove the car in a circuit around downtown Detroit, which many feel was the first horseless carriage in Detroit and possibly the state of Michigan.
Joined Early Automobile Companies
King joined the Olds Motor Works sometime around 1900, but only stayed there for a short time. He next joined the Northern Manufacturing Company, where he designed many of the cars manufactured by that company. He started his own automobile company, the King Motor Car Company, in 1910. Always the innovator, King designed the first American car with left hand steering and the first practical V-8 engine. He left the company in 1912.
Other Endeavors
In addition to being an innovative automobile designer and manufacturer, King was also a poet, architect, painter, musician and yachtsman. He founded the forerunner of the Automotive Hall of Fame in Dearborn, Michigan, an organization called the Automobile Old Timers in 1939. Henry Ford, who had witnessed King’s first ride in 1896, received help from King when he built his first horseless carriage. He also mentored Ransom E. Olds and other early automobile manufacturers. He helped design and build a yacht, the Lady Frances, which featured many new innovations. His other inventions included jackhammer, the lubricated pulley system, and the car steering gear.

Short History of Roads and Highways

Short History of Roads and Highways
Description:
From the first rude ridge ways to the modern interstate superhighway, the evolution of the road is a fascinating story. Readers will learn the progression of roads from the first ridge ways, roads in the ancient world, Roman roads and the development of the revolutionary McAdam Road. Native Americans developed an extensive system of trails for both trade and war. The pioneers used parts of these trails to forge the first traces that penetrated the interior of the developing United States. Readers can also follow the progression of the United States highway system from the first named highways to the modern interstate system first established in the late 1950’s.
Visit Mossy Feet Books on Facebook

See the Books Table of Contents
Preview Chapter
Preview Chapter


Buy Direct from Author
Softbound Price – $ 6.99





Table of Contents

Available In Multiple Formats – Ebook And Softbound:
Kindle
Amazon Softbound
Barnes & Noble
Barnes & Noble – Softbound
Kobo
Google Play
Scribid
24 Symbols
Walmart Books
Apple
Vivilio

Wholesale Pricing Available
For more information, contact:
Mossyfeetbooks@gmail.com
Orders over $50.00 Free Shipping
Join Paul Wonning on:
Facebook
Twitter
Linkedin
YouTube
Pinterest

Paul Wonning’s Books on Amazon Page
Paul Wonning’s Books on Scribd Page
Paul Wonning’s Books on Apple
Paul Wonning’s Books on Kobo
Paul Wonning’s Books on Barnes and Noble
Paul Wonning’s Books on 24 Symbols
Paul Wonning’s Books on Google Play
Paul Wonning’s Books on Indigo
Paul Wonning’s Books on Playster
Paul Wonning’s Books on OverDrive
Search Paul Wonning on Ingrams
© 2020 Paul Wonning

Other Books in the Series:Short History of Libraries, Printing and Language
Short History of Fire Fighting
Short History of Roads and Highways
Short History of Railroads
Short History of the Discoverers
Short History of Gardening and Agriculture
Short History of Public Parks
Short History of Political Parties
A Short History of Traditional Crafts
Table of Contents
Introduction
Evolution of Road Building Materials
Historic Roads
Native Roads and Wildlife roads in North America
Old Pioneer Roads
Post Road from Madison Portland, Maine, to Savannah, Georgia
The 1807 Gallatin Plan
The Bonus Bill – 1817
The American System 1820
Maysville Turnpike Act of 1827
Panic of 1837
Named Highways
Good Roads Movement
Office of Road Inquiry
American Motor League
The Horseless Age
American Automobile Association
Office of Public Roads
Questions Over Constitutionality of Federal Road Construction
American Association of State Highway Officials
Federal Aid Road Act of 1916
1919 Military Caravan
Federal Aid Highway Act of 1921
Pershing Map
Uniform Signage Introduced
United States Highway Numbering System Approved
Federal-Aid Highway Act of 1938
German Autobahns
Federal-Aid Highway Act of 1944
Federal-aid Highway Act of 1956
Classifications of Roads

Top of Page

Sample Chapter – Short History of Railroads – Railway switch patented by Charles Fox

Sample Chapter 
Short History of Railroads 
Railway switch patented by Charles Fox
1832 – Railway switch patented by Charles Fox
Before the railway switch, railroads used a device called wagon turnplates or a sliding rail.
Sliding Rail
This device resembled the modern turntable used to turn locomotives around or move them to different tracks in a train yard. In the sliding rail, the track was mounted to a circular wheel that rotated around the center of the device. The wheel’s diameter was governed by the length of the wagon used on the railroad, or tramway. To switch the device, the horses pulled the wagon onto the turnplate and unhitched. A tramway employee then had to rotate the turnplate so the rails matched that of the track he wanted to switch it to. Then the horses were hitched and the wagon could move along the new route. This was a cumbersome process that limited wagon size to that of the diameter of the turnplate and limited the weight on the wagon. Mr. Fox’s invention changed this.
The Rail Switch
The rail switch, or railway points, employed a set of linked, tapering rails that are synchronized in movement. These moving rails can be moved into one of two positions, one that allows the train to go straight or another position that turns the train onto a divergent set of rails. In the days before electrically powered switches, a railroad employee still had to manually operate the switch; however the train remained moving as it crossed the switch. The rail switch could accommodate any length of locomotive or rolling stock. As railroads switched over from horse drawn wagons to steam driven locomotives the rail switch proved a much more versatile mechanism for switching engines. The turnplate survives, with many improvements, as a means of moving locomotives around in a train yard or turning an engine around.

Sample Chapter – Short History of the Railroad – Delaware and Hudson Canal Company

Sample Chapter 
Short History of the Railroad 
Delaware and Hudson Canal Company
Two states, New York and Pennsylvania passed laws in 1823 and 1826 authorizing the construction of a canal, primarily to transport anthracite coal from the Wurts’ mine in Pennsylvania from the Delaware to the Hudson River. Canal officials broke ground on July 13, 1825. The Delaware and Hudson Canal Company opened for business in October 1828. The Pennsylvania assembly authorized the construction of a gravity railroad, owned by the Delaware and Hudson Canal Company to transport the coal from the mine to the canal.
Delaware and Hudson Gravity Railroad
The Pennsylvania assembly authorized the construction of the April 8, 1826 on April 8, 1826. The railroad company tried the first steam locomotive to run in the United States, the Sourbridge Lion, on August 8, 1829. The name derived from the lion’s face that adorned the front of the locomotive. The Foster, Rastrick and Company of Sourbridge, England manufactured the locomotive earlier in the year. The company had transported the locomotive in parts from Liverpool to New York on the ship John Jay. It arrived sometime in June or July and was taken to West Point Foundry in New York where workers assembled it. They tested it at the foundry, igniting the curiosity of nearby people. After transporting the locomotive to Honesdale, Pennsylvania, company officials prepared it for its first demonstration run. The company had specified that the locomotive weigh no more than four tons, as they had constructed wooden tracks with iron strips fastened to them. The locomotive actually weighed in at over seven tons. The engine operated admirably doing its three mile test run on August 8 1829. However, it was far too heavy for the rails and was never used. Workers used the locomotive for parts. The Smithsonian Institute acquired the boiler and a few other parts, which was all that was left, and has it on display in Washington DC.