Gardener’s Guide to Those Other Brassica Crops

Gardener’s Guide to Those Other Brassica Crops

Description:
Brassica crops in the cabbage family are among the most nutritious and flavorful crops grown in the garden. The Gardener’s Guide to Those Other Brassica Crops is a useful gardening guide for both beginning and veteran gardeners, includes cultural, preservation and planting information for collards, kale, Brussels sprouts and kohlrabi.

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Available in multiple ebook formats and softbound
Other Books in the Series

Gardeners’ Guide to Growing the Tomato
Gardeners Guide to Growing Green Beans
Gardener’s Guide to Growing Potatoes in the Vegetable Garden
Gardeners Guide to Growing Cabbage in the Vegetable Garden
Gardeners Guide to Growing to the Carrot
Gardener’s Guide to the Cucumber
Gardener’s Guide to Growing Sweet Potatoes
Gardener’s Guide to Growing Onions in the Vegetable Garden
Gardeners’ Guide Book Growing and Harvesting Lettuce
Gardener’s Guide to Growing Zuchini and Summer Squash
Gardeners’ Guide to Growing Peas
Gardener’s Guide to the Pepper
Gardener’s Guide to the Pumpkin and Winter Squash
Gardeners’ Guide to Growing Sweet Corn
Gardener’s Guide to Growing Beets
Gardener’s Guide to Growing Cauliflower
Gardener’s Guide to Growing Turnips and Rutabagas
Gardener’s Guide to Growing Broccoli
Gardener’s Guide to the Radish
Gardener’s Guide to Growing Garden Salad Greens
Gardener’s Guide to Those Other Brassica Crops
Gardeners Guide to Growing Vegetables

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Gardener’s Guide to Growing Turnips

Gardener’s Guide to Growing Turnips

Turnips and rutabagas are the backbone of the fall vegetable garden. Though planting in the spring is possible, turnips and rutabagas excel in the autumn. Learn the culture of growing these delicious roots and add them to your diet.
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Other Books in the Series

Gardeners’ Guide to Growing the Tomato
Gardeners Guide to Growing Green Beans
Gardener’s Guide to Growing Potatoes in the Vegetable Garden
Gardeners Guide to Growing Cabbage in the Vegetable Garden
Gardeners Guide to Growing to the Carrot
Gardener’s Guide to the Cucumber
Gardener’s Guide to Growing Sweet Potatoes
Gardener’s Guide to Growing Onions in the Vegetable Garden
Gardeners’ Guide Book Growing and Harvesting Lettuce
Gardener’s Guide to Growing Zuchini and Summer Squash
Gardeners’ Guide to Growing Peas
Gardener’s Guide to the Pepper
Gardener’s Guide to the Pumpkin and Winter Squash
Gardeners’ Guide to Growing Sweet Corn
Gardener’s Guide to Growing Beets
Gardener’s Guide to Growing Cauliflower
Gardener’s Guide to Growing Turnips and Rutabagas
Gardener’s Guide to Growing Broccoli
Gardener’s Guide to the Radish
Gardener’s Guide to Growing Garden Salad Greens
Gardener’s Guide to Those Other Brassica Crops
Gardeners Guide to Growing Vegetables


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Sample Chapter – Congress Authorizes John James Dufour to Select Land in Indiana Territory – Switzerland County

Ohio River – Switzerland County, Indiana

Sample Chapter

Indiana’s Timeless Tales – The Indiana Territory – Book 1

May 01, 1802 – Congress Authorizes John James Dufour to Select Land in Indiana Territory

John James Dufour immigrated to the United States to develop European style wines from American grown grapes. Thus far, American attempts to make a good wine had been a failure. Due to the efforts of John James Dufour, the commercial wine industry in the United States began in Switzerland County, Indiana.

John James Dufour (1763 – 1827)

A native of Canton de Vaud, Switzerland, Dufour studied viticulture for twenty years in Switzerland before coming to the United States in 1796. He had come representing the  Vineyard Society of Switzerland. The members of the organization were considering immigrating to America to make wine, escaping war torn Europe. He landed in Philadelphia in 1796 and embarked on a tour of vineyards across America that included stops at Thomas Jefferson’s Monticello, St. Louis, Missouri, Ohio, Pennsylvania and Kentucky. He eventually ended up at a site on the Big Bend of the Kentucky River about forty-five miles southeast of Lexington. He established an experimental vineyard at this site, planting thirty-five varieties of European grapes.

Promising Results

The vineyard proved so promising that in 1800, Dufour wrote to his family, still in Switzerland. Seventeen family members responded, coming to Lexington on July 3, 1801. The family operated this vineyard for a number of years.

Failure in Kentucky

The vineyard near Lexington eventually failed. Disease eventually killed the vines and the Dufours abandoned the site after selecting several varieties that had survived. These vines they believed to be still European vines, but in truth they were hybrids. The European varieties had cross bred with the European ones, creating vines that could withstand New World diseases and the harsh climate.

American Wines

American grapes would produce wine, but it was wine of an inferior quality. The grapes were tart and the wine they made was almost unpalatable to those that appreciate good wine. Early efforts to grow European grapes had ended in failure. The European grapes succumbed to New World pests and diseases to which they had no immunity. The harsh climate also proved fatal to the tender European vines. Wine drinkers had to drink imported wines which the European vintners had fortified with distilled spirits so they would survive the long voyage across the ocean.

Swiss Colony in the  Indiana Territory

Congress was receptive to the idea of establishing a wine industry in the United States and had encouraged Swiss vintners to come to America. Dufour thus found fertile ground for his proposal to Congress to grant him the right on May 1, 1802, to select and purchase four sections of land along the Ohio River in the Indiana  Territory to grow grapes. Congress passed the law that allowed Dufour to purchase this land with twelve years to pay it back. This was much more generous than the provisions of the Harrison Land Act of 1800 which allowed only four years to pay land in the Northwest Territory off.

Gardener’s Guide to Growing Cauliflower

Gardener’s Guide to Growing Cauliflower 
The Gardener’s Guide to Growing Cauliflower serves as a great how-to guide on the culture of growing cauliflower in the vegetable garden. The guide includes instructions on growing, pickling and otherwise preserving this delicious, nutritious vegetable.
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Gardener’s Guide to Growing Zucchini and Summer Squash

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Gardener’s Guide to Growing Zucchini and Summer Squash
Gardener’s Guide to Growing Zucchini and Summer Squash is a vegetable planting guide for the gardener that provides information for growing zucchini and other summer squash in the vegetable garden.
Summer squash can provide a bountiful harvest in the summer garden, providing squash for frying, grilling, pickling and casseroles. Since most are compact growers, the summer squash can provide loads of squash in a small area. Gardeners may want to plant multiple varieties of summer squash for a varied harvest.
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Available On:
Kindle
Amazon Softbound
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Kobo
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Other Books in the Series

Gardeners’ Guide to Growing the Tomato
Gardeners Guide to Growing Green Beans
Gardener’s Guide to Growing Potatoes in the Vegetable Garden
Gardeners Guide to Growing Cabbage in the Vegetable Garden
Gardeners Guide to Growing to the Carrot
Gardener’s Guide to the Cucumber
Gardener’s Guide to Growing Sweet Potatoes
Gardener’s Guide to Growing Onions in the Vegetable Garden
Gardeners’ Guide Book Growing and Harvesting Lettuce
Gardener’s Guide to Growing Zuchini and Summer Squash
Gardeners’ Guide to Growing Peas
Gardener’s Guide to the Pepper
Gardener’s Guide to the Pumpkin and Winter Squash
Gardeners’ Guide to Growing Sweet Corn
Gardener’s Guide to Growing Beets
Gardener’s Guide to Growing Cauliflower
Gardener’s Guide to Growing Turnips and Rutabagas
Gardener’s Guide to Growing Broccoli
Gardener’s Guide to the Radish
Gardener’s Guide to Growing Garden Salad Greens
Gardener’s Guide to Those Other Brassica Crops
Gardeners Guide to Growing Vegetables

Paul Wonning’s Books on Kobo
Available in multiple ebook formats and softbound

Wholesale Pricing Available
For more information, contact:
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Sample Chapter – Short History of Roads and Highways – Indiana Edition – Forks of Wabash

Sample Chapter 
Short History of Roads and Highways – Indiana Edition 
Forks of Wabash
This historical marker in Huntington, County notes the location of an important portage road that linked the Great Lakes with the Mississippi River.
Title of Marker:
Forks of Wabash
Location:
Business US 24/ W. Park Drive, east of SR 9 junction, Huntington. (Huntington County, Indiana)
Installed by:
Society of Indiana Pioneers
Marker ID #: 
35.1972.1
Marker Text: 
The junction of the Wabash and Little rivers, 100 yards south, was the western terminus of the Maumee-Wabash long portage and, in 1835, of the first section of the Wabash and Erie Canal. During the 18th century French and English traders passed this way and, in 1778, Henry Hamilton brought 171 British troops and 350 Indians with 40 boats through the portage en-route to retake Fort Sackville at Vincennes. Three Miami villages were located here and Chiefs Richardville and LaFontaine once lived here. The Forks was the scene of many Indian councils and the Miami Treaties of 1834, 1838 and 1840.
Brief History by the Author
During the late Seventeenth Century the Miami tribe controlled one of the most valuable pieces of real estate in the Ohio River Valley. The area between the St. Mary’s River and Wabash River proved the shortest portage point between two great waterways, the Great Lakes and the Mississippi River. The portage, or “carrying place” in French, allowed travelers moving by water access to the Mississippi River from the St. Lawrence River and beyond. The French utilized the portage, at the pleasure of the Miami, during their early explorations into the North American interior. The Miami realized the importance of the portage, as it had been used by Amerindian tribes for centuries. The tribe allowed their friends, the French, to use it, after paying a toll.
The Importance of the Portage
Traveling by canoe, a traveler could voyage from Lake Erie up the Maumee River to the junction of three rivers, the Maumee, St. Joseph and St. Mary’s. From the junction, the route turned southeast on the St. Mary’s to the portage point. Canoeists needed only carry their canoes a short distance, which varied by the season of the year, only a few miles from the portage point on the St. Mary’s River to the Wabash. Once in the Wabash a traveler could journey down the Wabash to the Ohio and on to the Mississippi. The French used to portage point to move goods from their colonies in New France to New Orleans. The Amerindians used it to move the furs they collected to their trading partners further east. All these travelers had to pass through the lands of the Miami Indians, who collected a toll from everyone.
Fort Wayne
Realizing the importance of the spot where the three rivers joined, the French established a trading post near the junction in 1715, followed in 1722 by a fort. The English also occupied the site after driving the French from North America at the conclusion of the French and Indian War. General Anthony Wayne built another fort on the junction during the Indian Wars. Many of the treaty negotiations between the Amerindians and the United States took place there. The portage maintained importance until the 1830’s, when the Wabash-Erie Canal made it unnecessary.

Sample Chapter – Short History of Roads and Highways – Indiana Edition – Mammoth Internal Improvements Act

Sample Chapter
Short History of Roads and Highways – Indiana Edition

January 16, 1836 – Assembly Passed Mammoth Internal Improvement Act of 1836
The Indiana General Assembly passed what many hoped would be a financial boon for the developing state of Indiana. Instead, the Act led to financial ruin.
The State of the State in 1836
When Indiana became a state in 1816, the state was a vast network of forest, prairie, rivers and streams. White settlement clung to the southern counties along the Ohio River, with a sliver of settlement along the Wabash River in the west. Amerindian tribes still claimed the northern two-thirds of the state. By the 1830’s, the situation had not changed much. Indianapolis, the new state capital, was a muddy pioneer settlement along the White River. The southern counties had access to the Ohio River, the only good means of transportation. Since only the Wabash River was navigable, other parts of the state had no access to reliable transportation systems. The only roads were a loose, unorganized network of trails cut through the wilderness. The state had begun construction on the Michigan Road, slated to be a main artery between Lake Michigan and Madison on the Ohio River, but construction would not finish until the 1840’s. The Buffalo Trace provided a rough highway from Vincennes to Clarksville. By 1830, Indiana had a population of about 600,000 people. Tax revenues for the state totaled around $50,000.
Tax Revenue
Indiana had two sources of tax revenue in 1830, property taxes and poll taxes, each providing about half the state’s revenue. Indiana and other states admitted to the Union after 1803 were prohibited from taxing land purchased from the federal government for a period of five years. Thus, by the mid 1830’s, vast areas of land that it could not previously tax were entering the tax base. In addition, land sales remained high in the state during the period, so more lands would continually enter the revenue stream.  Indiana expected to double its tax revenue in just a few years. Moreover, anything the assembly could do to increase land values would increase tax revenue. This was especially true if the state switched to a different tax system. The state used a per acre tax system, placing a greater tax burden on agricultural land. The state switched to an ad valorem system in 1835, which permitted the state to tax both land and personal property at a rate based on its assessed value. This system reduced the burden on farmers and increased it on merchants, homeowners and manufacturers.
The Geographic Quandary
The rising star of transportation in the early 1830’s were canals. New York had great success with the Erie Canal and there were other examples. Railroads had not yet become mainstream. Thus, most states had canal construction projects. The problem with canals is that they are geographic specific in the benefits they bestowed and widespread in the taxing requirements to produce the revenue to finance them. The assembly struggled for years over this problem. How to tax everyone in the state for a canal that would only benefit one geographic region was the unanswerable question. The answer seemed to be, build them all at once and jump-start an economic boom everywhere in the state. This is what the Mammoth Internal Improvement Act of 1836 sought to do.
Mammoth Internal Improvement Act of 1836
Signed into law by Governor Noah Noble, the act was meant to be his crowning achievement. The law authorized the Indiana Central Canal, the Whitewater Canal, the Wabash and Erie Canal, the Madison and Indianapolis Railroad, paving the Buffalo Trace and Michigan Road. The bill provided for a Board of Internal Improvement, which was authorized to borrow up to ten million dollars, based on the good faith and credit of the State. Jubilant celebrations took place all over the state with the passage of the bill. Governor Noble was cautious because the Assembly had passed the spending portion of his program, but had not followed his tax increase recommendations.
Too Much at Once
The aims of the law, while noble, were much too ambitious. Construction of canals is an expensive business. Construction of the Whitewater Canal was impaired by a flood that washed out much of the completed work. Many of the sites slated for canal construction were in reality not suitable sites. Then the Panic of 1837 set in.
Panic of 1837
This complex event created an economic depression that lasted from about 1837 until 1842. The multiple causes were questionable lending practices in the Western United States, restrictive lending policies enacted by Great Britain and falling agricultural prices. The period before 1837 had been a period of intense economic growth. During this time the prices of cotton and other commodities rose. Land prices also increased. The Bank of England noticed a decline in cash on hand in 1836. They raised interest rates in an attempt to attract more cash. When the Bank of England raised its interest, it forced banks in the United States and other nations to raise their rates. This, along with other events, caused land and cotton prices to fall. The chain of events this set off triggered a depression that caused profits, prices, and wages to fall and increased the unemployment rates. It was not until 1843 that the economies of the major countries rebounded.
Tax Revenues Fall, Then Disaster
The conditions induced by the Panic created an economic depression. Land values fell, as did tax revenues. Instead of having more revenue to work with, the State found itself with less. By 1841, tax revenues were $72,000 while interest payments on the debt reached $500,000. The State was bankrupt. The State had not completed any of the slated projects. It was left to Madison’s James F.D. Lanier to use his financial wizardry to convince creditors to take over the projects for a fifty percent reduction in the debt. Creditors were only able to complete two of these projects. Lanier also aided the state with two loans totaling one million dollars. The State managed to repay it by 1870.
Thus, what many consider the biggest legislative debacle of all time ended.

Short History of Roads and Highways Indiana Edition

Short History of
Roads and Highways
Indiana Edition

Short History of Roads and Highways – Indiana Edition 

Description:
From the first rude ridgeways to the modern interstate superhighway, the evolution of the road is a fascinating story. Readers will learn the progression of roads from the first ridgeways, roads in the ancient world, Roman roads and the development of the revolutionary McAdam Road. Native Americans developed an extensive system of trails for both trade and war. The Short History of Roads and Highways – Indiana Edition includes information on early Amerindian trails, pioneer traces and the beginnings of the modern Indiana highway system.
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Sample Chapter
Sample Chapter
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Other Books in the Series
Short History of Libraries, Printing and Language – Indiana Edition
Short History of Fire Fighting – Indiana Edition
Short History of Railroads- Indiana Edition
Table of Contents

Introduction

Evolution of Road Building Materials

Historic Roads

Native Roads and Wildlife roads in North America

Old Pioneer Roads

Post Road from Madison Portland, Maine, to Savannah, Georgia

The 1807 Gallatin Plan

The Bonus Bill – 1817

The American System 1820

Maysville Turnpike Act of 1827

Panic of 1837

Named Highways

Good Roads Movement

Office of Road Inquiry

American Motor League 

The Horseless Age 

American Automobile Association

Office of Public Roads

Questions Over Constitutionality of Federal Road Construction

American Association of State Highway Officials

 Federal Aid Road Act of 1916

 1919 Military Caravan

Federal Aid Highway Act of 1921

Pershing Map

Uniform Signage Introduced

United States Highway Numbering System Approved

Federal-Aid Highway Act of 1938

German Autobahns

Federal-Aid Highway Act of 1944

 Federal-aid Highway Act of 1956

Classifications of Roads

Indiana Edition

Indiana Amerindian Trails

Indiana Pioneer Traces

National Road 1829 – Indiana’s First Superhighway – the Michigan Road

Napoleon-Brookville Road

Indiana Roads Prior to 1850

January 16, 1836 – Assembly Passed Mammoth Internal Improvement Act of 1836

Indiana Roads Between 1850 and 1900

Automobiles and Bicycles Fuel Demand for Better Roads

Lincoln Highway

March 07, 1917 – Act Authorizing Main Market Highways Signed

1919  – Indiana State Highway Commission

Indiana Highway Time Line

Gardeners’ Guide Book Growing and Harvesting Lettuce

Gardeners’ Guide Book Growing
and Harvesting Lettuce

Gardeners’ Guide Book Growing and Harvesting Lettuce

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The Gardeners’ Guide Book Growing and Harvesting Lettuce will provide needed information for the gardener to plant, grow and harvest this delectable crop in the vegetable salad garden. Lettuce culture is not hard allowing the knowledgeable gardener to grow several varieties for colorful, delicious salads.
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Available On:
Kindle
Amazon Softbound
Barnes & Noble
Barnes and Noble Softbound
Kobo
Google Play
Apple
Walmart Books
Scribid
24 Sympols

Other Books in the Series

Gardeners’ Guide to Growing the Tomato
Gardeners Guide to Growing Green Beans
Gardener’s Guide to Growing Potatoes in the Vegetable Garden
Gardeners Guide to Growing Cabbage in the Vegetable Garden
Gardeners Guide to Growing to the Carrot
Gardener’s Guide to the Cucumber
Gardener’s Guide to Growing Sweet Potatoes
Gardener’s Guide to Growing Onions in the Vegetable Garden
Gardeners’ Guide Book Growing and Harvesting Lettuce
Gardener’s Guide to Growing Zuchini and Summer Squash
Gardeners’ Guide to Growing Peas
Gardener’s Guide to the Pepper
Gardener’s Guide to the Pumpkin and Winter Squash
Gardeners’ Guide to Growing Sweet Corn
Gardener’s Guide to Growing Beets
Gardener’s Guide to Growing Cauliflower
Gardener’s Guide to Growing Turnips and Rutabagas
Gardener’s Guide to Growing Broccoli
Gardener’s Guide to the Radish
Gardener’s Guide to Growing Garden Salad Greens
Gardener’s Guide to Those Other Brassica Crops
Gardeners Guide to Growing Vegetables


Available in multiple ebook formats and softbound
© Mossy Feet Books 2016

Create Space – Softcover Book
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Gardener’s Guide to Growing Sweet Potatoes

Gardener’s Guide to Growing Sweet Potatoes 

Gardener’s Guide to Growing
Sweet Potatoes

Gardener’s Guide to Growing Sweet Potatoes includes the culture for growing, harvesting and storing them. It also lists most sweet potato problems, online sources and many of the sweet potato varieties available to the home gardener. Veteran and beginner gardeners alike can benefit from the sweet potato growing information in this book.

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